Category Archives: Eastern Point

ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL SCENTS ON ALL OF CAPE ANN – ‘SAILOR’S DELIGHT’ SUMMERSWEET

Clethra alnifolia is more commonly known by its many descriptive names of Summersweet, Sweet Pepperbush, and Honeysweet. In an old book on fragrance, written by Louise Beebe Wilder, she writes that in Gloucester of old it was described as ‘Sailor’s Delight.’ During the 19th and early 20th century, as told by Wilder, the sailors entering the harbor on homebound ships would reportedly delight in its fragrance wafting out to see.

Much of Niles Pond road is to this day lined with great thickets of ‘Sailor’s Delight.’ Wild Clethra growing on Cape Ann blooms during the month of August.

The following is an excerpt from a book that I wrote back in 2004-2007, which was published by David R. Godine in 2009. The book is about designing landscape habitats for wild creatures and for people, titled Oh Garden of Fresh Possibilities: Notes from a Gloucester Garden, and all that I wrote then, still holds true to day.

“Summersweet bears small white florets held on racemes, and depending on the cultivar may be shaded with varying hues of pink to rose-red. The tapering spires of fragrant blossoms appear in mid to late summer. Clethra has a sweet and spicy though somewhat pungent aroma, and when the summer air is sultry and humid, the fragrance permeates the garden, Summersweet is a nectar food attractive to bees and a wide variety of butterflies, notably the Silver-spotted Skipper.” See more at Oh GardenMyriad species of bees and butterflies, along with Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, are attracted to Clethra for its sweet nectar, while American Robins, Goldfinches and warblers dine on Summersweet’s ripened berries.
Clethra fruits ripening

MASKED BEAUTIES – CEDAR WAXWINGS ON THE POINT!

A flock of beautiful beautiful Cedar Waxwings graced our shores over the weekend. They  were devouring ripening fruits and seeds found on local native trees, shrubs, and wildflowers.Cedar Waxwings mostly eat berries and they love a wide variety. Their name is actually derived from one of their favorite fruits, the waxy berries of cedar trees. If you would like to attract Cedar Waxwings  to your garden here is a handy list that I compiled –

Dogwood, Juniper, Chokecherry, Cedar, Honeysuckle, Holy, Crabapple, Hawthorn, Serviceberry, Mulberry, Raspberry, Grapes, and Strawberry. Cedar Waxwings are becoming increasingly more prevalent in backyards because people are planting more ornamental flowering and fruiting trees.

GLOUCESTER EAST IN THE LIFTING FOG

Friday afternoon into evening the light was spectacular in our neighborhood, The fog was coming and receeding in waves. At moments the sun was shining brightly, seconds later, the sun and anything ten feet in front of you was obscured.

 

BEAUTIFUL EASTERN POINT LIGHTHOUSE IN THE LIFTING FOG

Beautiful foggy Friday afternoon into evening. I have a bunch to post from this foggy afternoon and will do so tomorrow when I have more time, but isn’t this one scene evocative? I filmed it as well, with the waves crashing into Mother Ann in the fog and will add it to my YouTube show, “Good News Cape Ann!’ airing Sunday night. See you then 🙂

EARTH DAY 1970 – 2020: “MONARCH BUTTERFLIES MATING” SHORT FILM AND WHY WE PLANT NATIVE WILDFLOWER HABITAT GARDENS!

An excerpt from my forthcoming film, Beauty on the Wing: Life Story of the Monarch Butterfly, shows three of the wildflowers found in our gardens, meadows, and marshes that attracts Monarchs, along with myriad species of other pollinators.

Plant the two milkweeds listed below and you, too, will have Monarchs mating in your garden!

Featuring:

Seaside Goldenrod (Solidago sempervirens) that supports southward migrating Monarchs.

Marsh Milkweed (Ascleipias incarnata), one of the milkweeds most readily used by ovipositing female Monarchs.

Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca). A study published last year that shows Common Milkweed is THE milkweed for Monarchs!

Music by Jesse Cook

NEW YOU TUBE SHOW – GOOD NEWS CAPE ANN EPISODE #3

 

Good News Cape Ann! – Episode #3

The opening clip is a beautiful scene overlooking Good Harbor Beach. The sun was beginning to appear through a snow squall – April snow squalls bring May flowers.

Good Harbor Beach was jam packed with surfers this morning and Brant Geese were bobbing around at Brace Cove.

Quick glimpse of pretty mystery bird? Palm Warbler?

Fisherman’s Wharf Gloucester fresh fish curbside pickup. Each week they have gotten better and better. It was dream of ease and coronavirus protocols. Tuesday through Saturday and here is the number to call 978-281-7707

Rockport Exchange Virtual Farmer’s Market https://kimsmithdesigns.com/2020/04/19/rockport-exchange-virtual-farmers-market-is-open-heres-how-it-works/

Brother’s Brew, Seaview Farm, Breakwater Roasters, Sandy Bay Soaps, and many more.

What are some of the favorite dishes you are cooking during Coronavirus?

Tragedies can bring out the best in people, but also the very worst. Cruel people only become crueler and more mean spirited, posting mean thoughtless pranks that they think elevate themselves. I wish this wasn’t happening in our own lives and on social media. We all need to support each other.

Share your local business news.

Last episode of the Snowy Owl Film Project at kimsmithdesigns.com

Wonderful hopeful news for our Good Harbor Beach Piping Plovers. The City has created a safe zone in the spot where they are attempting to nest. Thank you Mayor Sefatia and Gloucester’s DPW for installing the symbolic roping. We need signs and hopefully they will be along very soon.

Thanks so much to everybody for watching 🙂

Possibly a Palm Warbler

 

PARKING BAN AT NILES BEACH AND NEIGHBORHOOD STREETS SURROUNDING GOOD HARBOR BEACH AND WINGAERSHEEK BEACH

New beach parking restrictions are being implemented by the Mayor’s office. These restrictions include Witham Street, Nautilus Road, Eastern Point Road (the road that runs along Niles Beach) and the neighborhood roads around Wingaersheek Beach.

Barricades were placed today in several locations and we imagine more will be forthcoming.

 

Niles Beach Eastern Point Road is clearly barricaded and marked

No barriers yet on Nautilus Road (we expect they are coming)

No barriers yet on Witham Street 

New barriers at the corner of Witham and 127A

Walk-ons allowed and bike stand still in place at Good Harbor Beach

Good Harbor Beach this afternoon, in and out of storms

NILES POND PANORAMA AND EXQUISITE LIGHT LATE YESTERDAY

Late afternoon when the clouds cleared briefly – click the panorama to view full size.

 

AMERICAN PIPIT PAIR ARE STILL HERE!

Throughout the winter of 2019-2020 we have been graced with a sweet pair of Pipits. As you can see from the map, we are fairly far north of their winter range. Sunday, March 15th, the two were seen again in their usual location at Brace Cove.  They have found plenty to eat, between the wildflower seed heads and the tiny mollusks and insects available in the seaweed

BEAUTIFUL CAPE ANN LIGHT, BEAUTIFUL BRACE COVE

That beautiful Cape Ann rosie pink light

SWAN ALERT!

A young Mute Swan arrived at Niles Pond this morning. He/she seems a bit travel weary and spent most of the day sleeping. As a matter of fact, I didn’t see him eat once. This is very unusual behavior for Mute Swans who spend their days alternating between foraging, preening, resting briefly, and then resuming eating.

He at first was closer to shore, but a Coyote was skittering around the edge of the pond this morning and perhaps that is why the young visitor moved to the center of the pond.

You can see that he is very young because he has so much brown in his feathers.

WILDLY WINDY GLOUCESTER AFTER STORM

After Thursday’s storm we tried going for a beach walk at Good Harbor, Brace Cove, and Niles before giving up and finding a less windy stroll along Niles Pond.  The water was a gorgeous deep ultramarine and even the inner harbor was beautiful with whitecaps.

MESSAGE FROM GLOUCESTER’S MISSING PERSON ABBIE FLYNN’S FAMILY – WE JUST WANT ABBIE BACK

SALEM NEWS

BY TAYLOR ANN BRADFORD

GLOUCESTER — When Brian Flynn found out that his sister Abbie was missing, he hopped on the next available flight to the East Coast.

Abbie Flynn, 59, of Gloucester went missing on Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 2, around 4:30 p.m. after she had prepared to host a party at her Saint Louis Avenue home.

Ten days later, the search and investigation into the Gloucester resident’s disappearance is still inconclusive.

“I got the call on the Sunday night that Abbie went missing,” said Brian, who currently lives in Bermuda. “The Mass. State Police sent out a Facebook alert. I was with my son in California and he saw it and drove me right to the airport so I was at the house at 10 a.m.”

He said that Flynn’s family — Brian, his wife Leslie, her three children and husband Rich — were all there Monday morning.

“We just want to get Abbie back,” Brian said Friday. “That is all we care about.”

As the investigation continues, Brian feels that the family has been embraced by the entire city.

READ THE COMPLETE ARTICLE HERE: https://www.salemnews.com/news/local_news/we-just-want-abbie-back/article_13709d2e-14f5-585e-bf40-10755d65d71d.html

PLEASE CONTACT THE GLOUCESTER POLICE DEPARTMENT WITH ANY INFORMATION ABOUT ABBIE’S WHEREABOUTS. 978-283-1212

CHIEF CONLEY: ABBIE FLYNN’S DISAPPEARANCE HAS ZERO CONNECTION TO ANY OTHER MISSING PERSON

GLOUCESSTER DAILY TIMES

BY TAYLOR ANN BRADFORD

Since 59-year-old Abbie Flynn went missing on Super Bowl Sunday, people across Cape Ann and further away have been trying to figure out what happened.

People have hypothesized about coyotes, suspicious vehicles, and made connections to drownings and other missing person cases in social media posts and in phone calls to the Times.

The Gloucester Police Department wants to put the public at ease.

“There is no indication, zero at all, no, none that this is connected in any way to any other cases or that foul play was involved,” police Chief Ed Conley told the Times on Thursday.

Conley confirmed that this is based on evidence.

“I have been as clear and transparent as I possibly can,” he said. “If I thought there was some sort of danger to the public, I would err on the side of releasing that information rather than keep it. But there is none.”

READ THE FULL STYORY HERE:

https://www.gloucestertimes.com/news/local_news/zero-connection-to-any-other-missing-person/article_55194be4-6976-5ccf-aea6-2952a2f82c3c.html


The coat Abbie may have been wearing the day she vanished.

WHAT ABBIE FLYNN MAY HAVE BEEN WEARING WHEN SHE WENT MISSING

This is the coat Abbie was most likely wearing the day she vanished. Reportedly she did not have her camera gear with her.

5,000 POSTERS PRINTED FOR MISSING PERSON ABBIE FLYNN

Abbie Flynn’s high school friend, Katerina Shim Jensen Graham, has created 5,000 missing person posters. They will be distributed by volunteers all around Gloucester in the upcoming days.

UNDERWATER SONAR SEARCH FOR GLOUCESTER MISSING PERSON ABBIE FLYNN

Today marks the ninth day that Abbie Flynn went missing. I spoke with Gloucester Police Detective Quinn this morning as he and state police officers were awaiting the arrival of the Harbormaster’s boat. The underwater sonar search is standard under these circumstances and is not being carried out because new information has been discovered or reported. Gloucester detectives waiting for the Harbormaster

How the sonar search works, as explained by GP detectives. The sonar can see  the bottom of the seabed for about thirty to forty feet. The boat will criss cross Brace Cove until the floor of the Cove has been thoroughly scanned. Sometimes rocks or other anomalies get in the way and they return to an area. All the data is recorded on GPS coordinates so that if they have to return with a dive team to investigate, they know just where to go.

The search is coming to an end as of 1pm today. Nothing out of the ordinary has been discovered.

Harbormaster criss crossing Brace Cove with sonar

Our thoughts and prayers are with Abbie and her family and friends. This is an ongoing investigation. Please report any clues or information you may have seen or heard to the Gloucester Police at 978-283-1212.

Thank you to Detective Quinn and to a second Gloucester officer for information provided (so sorry I did not get his name). I want to let our readers know that the Gloucester Police are doing an outstanding job. Last week I met Detective Mizzoni to share information and can only say that in speaking with the detectives, they are leaving no stones unturned. Their compassion is more than apparent and desire to provide transparent information to the public is sincere. Solving the disappearance of Abbie is their utmost priority.

GLOUCESTER MISSING PERSON ABBIE FLYNN DAY 7

Today marks a full week from when Abbie Flynn was first reported missing by friends at approximately 6pm on Sunday, February 2nd. Friends arrived at her home to attend a Super Bowl get together only to find party preparations underway, but the home empty.

After several days of a massive search, which included a coordinated effort by land, sea, and air, with seemingly no trace nor clues left behind, Eastern Point has resumed its former quietude. Yesterday, Saturday, morning I took a walk around the Point. There were many others out walking in the howling wind. A lone coyote trotted along the berm, a flock of turkeys foraged in their usual locale, the ducks were diving and feeding on pond vegetation, the gulls resting on the half frozen water, and our winter resident juvenile Black-crowned Night Heron was still present. On the face of it  all, everything appears back to normal but in reality, there is a terrible sense of eerie disquietude.

Friends and family are heartsick about Abbie’s disappearance. Please let’s not forget Abbie. If you have any clues or thoughts about her disappearance, please contact the Gloucester PD at 978-283-1212.

Many of us continue to be struck by how similar to Abbie’s disappearance is that of Theresa Cohen’s disappearance. Both seemed to vanish into thin air. According to the Charley Report, Theresa’s case was reported solved just this past week. After two years, that in itself is suspect. If Theresa did take her own life, we truly wish the Rockport Police would reveal how that is known. Our understanding is that only a few of her remains were found at a beach in Chatham, which certainly does not seem evidence enough of suicide. Out of respect for her family, we don’t want to know the details, just how it was determined. Providing transparent information would put a great many Rockport and Gloucester residents mind at ease and end the continuing suspicion and speculation.

Edited note – It has come to my attention that someone has commented that this post is a negative comment on the great work the police have done in investigating the disappearance of Abbie Flynn. Nothing could be further from the truth. I only have the utmost respect for the hard work, concern, and dedication the Gloucester officers and detectives have devoted to solving the mystery of Abbie’s disappearance. There simply remain many unanswered questions. It is my greatest hope that Abbie is found.

Our thoughts and prayers are with Abbie’s family and friends.

  

BOSTON TO GLOUCESTER DAY’S END

Day’s end from the Eastern Point lighthouse looking towards Boston.

VIBRANT CHRISTMAS DAY SUNSET FROM GLOUCESTER HARBOR, EASTERN POINT, AND NILES BEACH

Gloucester Harbor

Rocky Neck

Niles Beach

Liv Hauck Eastern Point Lighthouse phone photo

GLORIOUS BRACE COVE SUNRISE (WITH SEALS)

Although frigid, the well-insulated Harbor Seals were lolling on the rocks well before the sun rose.

#GLOUCESTERMA SNOWSTORM HIGH TIDE EASTERN POINT LIGHTHOUSE, BACKSHORE, GOOD HARBOR BEACH SURFERS, TWIN LIGHTS, AND TURKEYS

At sunset this evening, the skies cleared for a bit and one could see the snowstorm departing in an easterly direction, while more squalls were beginning to blow ashore from the west. The nearly half-Moon was rising over the marsh through the clouds. Swells along the backshore were larger than average, but nothing nearly as dramatic as the waves during a nor’easter. Perhaps the waves were bigger on the other side of the Island.

Although I didn’t get a snapshot, the small flock of Wild Turkeys was leaping about at the base of a bird feeder, hungrily looking for food. Which was actually pretty funny because grace is decidedly not a characteristic shared with these large-bottom birds. I wished I had a handful to give them.

HELLO LITTLE DECEMBER SNOW BUNTINGS!

Sunday afternoon while walking along Brace Cove I by chance met up with my friend Michelle. I was showing her where to look for the Lark Sparrow when Michelle spotted a beautiful male Snow Bunting, and then we spotted a second! They were pecking at the sand looking for seeds caught between the granules.

Also called “Snowflakes,” their arrival on our shores seems appropriate enough for the pending snowstorm 🙂

An interesting note about Snow Buntings – Male Snow Buntings look very different in their breeding and non-breeding plumage. Not due to molting, but because they rub their bellies and heads in the snow, wearing down brown feather tips to reveal pure white feathers beneath.

BEAUTIFUL WILDLIFE CURRENTLY AT EASTERN POINT, BRACE COVE, AND NILES POND – GREAT BLUE HERON, HARBOR SEALS, AMERICAN COOTS, BONAPARTE’S GULLS, RUDDY DUCKS, RING-NECKED DUCKS, LARK SPARROW AND WILL THE RECENTLY DEPARTED SWANS RETURN?

The past week Eastern Point has seen a wonderful influx of wildlife, in addition to the beautiful creatures already wintering over and migrating through.

On Tuesday before Thanksgiving, a great raft of Ring-necked Ducks joined the flock of Buffleheads and Mallards at Niles Pond. Five chunky American Coots have been there for over a week, and two female Ruddy Ducks have been spotted.

American Coot

Fifteen Harbor Seals were sunning and basking on the rocks at Brace Cove on Wednesday, along with several Bonaparte’s Gulls that were diving and foraging in the waves. The increasingly less timid Lark Sparrow is still here, too.

Lark Sparrow

Great Blue Heron agitating the Ring-necked Ducks

The most enigmatic of Great Blue Herons criss crosses the pond a dozen times a day but, unlike last year’s fall migrating GBH, who allowed for a closer glimpse, this heron is super people shy. He has been here for about a week and was present again today.

This morning I watched the four beautiful Mute Swans depart over Brace Rock, in a southerly direction. Will they return? Mute Swans migrate from body of water to body of water within a region. Perhaps they will return, or they could possibly have flown to a nearby location–further exploring our Island.

The four had not returned to Niles Pond by day’s end. If any of our readers sees a group of four Mute Swans, please write and let us know. Thank you so much!

Leaving Niles Pond this morning and flying over Brace Cove.

THE RARELY SEEN IN MASSACHUSETTS LARK SPARROW IS STILL WITH US!

The sweet Lark Sparrow has been spotted daily at Eastern Point now for over two weeks. I’ve been able to take a longer look on a sunny day and think he is an immature Lark Sparrow because he lacks the rich chestnut color of an adult.

On one fine chilly, chilly morning, he even let me spend more than a few moments watching as he dozed in the sun while puffing his feathers for warmth.

The Lark Sparrow spends a good deal of time foraging on the ground for tiny seeds. When disturbed, he flies up into the trees and at that moment you can catch a glimpse of the white outlined feathers of the bird’s long rounded tail.

Lark Sparrow tail feathers

Unlike Song Sparrows that dart and zoom horizontally across the landscape, when heading to the next location, the Lark Sparrow flies upward in more of a whirring helicopter movement. I love this little bird and if he stays all winter I hope he will find plenty of seeds to eat.

Lark Sparrow foraging for seeds

Compare and contrast the Song Sparrow to the Lark Sparrow. Both species are currently at Eastern Point/Niles Pond area. Both species forage on the ground for tiny seeds. The breast of the Song Sparrow is streaky while the breast of the Lark Sparrow is solid white with a dot of black feathers centered at the upper chest.

Song Sparrow Eastern Point

Don’t you find it fascinating, these avian visitors that are so far off course that find themselves on our shores? Here’s an account from 1905 —

The Lark Sparrow in Massachusetts.– On August 12, 1905, at Ipswich, Massachusetts, I observed at close range a Lark Sparrow (Chondesres grammacus). This makes the sixth record of this species for the State, and the fourth for Essex County. Nearly a year before this, on August 21, 1904, I took at Ipswich an adult male Lark Sparrow (Birds [Auk 104 General Notes. I. Jan. of Essex County, p. 268). It has occurred to me that stragglers in the migrations along our Eastern Coast may not be so very rare, but that they are overlooked, being mistaken for Vesper Sparrows, owing to the ‘white outer tail feathers. In both of the above instances, however, the slightly fan-shaped tail, and the fact that the white was not confined to the two outer feathers, as in the Vesper Sparrow, attracted my eye. The characteristic marking on the side of the head in the Lark Sparrow, seen with a glass within thirty feet, made the diagnosis in the second ca. From the Supplement to the Birds of Essex County by Charles Wendell Townsend.