Category Archives: Cape Ann

STUNNING FROST BEAVER FULL MOON RISE WITH HARBOR SEALS AND EVENING SUNSET!

Sunday night was simply wonderful for sky watching. Looking eastward, the nearly full Beaver Moon (also called Frost Moon) rose over Brace Cove while the seals were still lolling about on the rocks. Passing Niles Beach on the way home the last lingering red rays of light were illuminating the Boston skyline and the Dogbar Breakwater light.

Called the Beaver Moon because according to the Old Farmer’s  Almanac, November is when Beaver’s head into their lodges for the winter.

 

Full Beaver Moon rising

Harbor Seals in the rising moon and fading sun Brace Cove

 

SATURDAY DECEMBER 5TH IS THE LAST DAY TO PAINT BUOYS AT ART HAVEN, RESERVE NOW!

LOBSTER TRAPS HAVE ARRIVED, COME ON DOWN AND LEND A HAND UNLOADING!

Traps are on their way from Maine! We can’t wait to get started building the 2020 tree!!! Swing down to the police station this morning and help us unload the 350 traps that will make up the tree! Truck will be here at 10am thanks to Three Lanterns and Brooks Trap!

Rest In Peace JUD GALE – Farewell dear friend, beloved by so many

Our dear friend Jud Gale passed away on November 18, 2020. He was 93 and 3/4 year old. Jud  lived everyday to the fullest and was an inspiration to all of we who were blessed to know him. He left behind his beautiful blended family of Gales and Gunns, along with a community of loving friends. Jud had the most remarkable ability to change and grow with the times and always took interest in other people’s stories. He was beloved for his compassion, sense of humor and fun, his ability to council wisely, and kind and generous nature.

Jud’s daughter Emily Gale, who, along with his wife Kari, were with him by his side at his passing.  Emily shared his obituary this morning and wrote the following, “Despite outliving most of the mates of his youth, hundreds of people wanted to express how much he meant to them at his memorial service and after, including myself. It was a great gift to be his daughter.” Jud’s memorial service was held virtually at the Annisquam Village Church.

Justin Edgerton Gale
January 8, 1927 – November 18, 2020

Justin Edgerton “Jud” Gale, 93, passed away peacefully at home in Annisquam, a

neighborhood of Gloucester, MA on Wednesday November 18, 2020. He was

surrounded by love. His passing leaves a giant hole in the hearts of his devoted wife,

Kari (nee Scott) Gunn Gale; his children Henry and wife Susan, his son Peter, his son

Benjamin and wife Kristina, and his daughter Emily. Kari and Emily were at his side

for the past many weeks. Jud also leaves 8 grandchildren (Jessica, Elizabeth,

Bennett, Bill, Sarah, Katrina, Sam, and Juliana); 7 great grandchildren (Isobel, Avery,

Aaron, Emma, Aidin, Riley, and Clara); his brother James and wife Virginia; his brother in

law Edward Reynolds; and Kari’s family Catherine Gunn, MaryHelen Gunn, Matthew

Laurence, and Sophie Laurence. He was predeceased in June 2009 by his first wife of 59

years, Betsy (nee Miriam Elizabeth Peabody) and later by his sister Joan Gale Reynolds.

Jud was born in 1927 in Boston MA, the eldest of 3 children. After graduating from

Phillips Academy Andover, he was enrolled at Tufts University for 2 years in the

Naval ROTC. As WWII ended, he began 2 years at Harvard University, where he was

the stroke for the National Championship Crew team (inducted into the Harvard

Varsity Club Hall of Fame in 1973). He was then named the Harvard Fellow

at Emmanuel College, Cambridge University, and set sail for England. It was on this

voyage that he met his beloved wife Betsy.

 

Jud spent 37 successful years working for Proctor and Gamble. He raised his family

in Terrace Park, OH and gave of himself and his time to support St. Thomas Church

and its charitable works and the Terrace Park community. Retiring at age 60, he

went on to a second career supporting HUD based programs in subsidized housing

and the people who lived within. He joined and took leadership positions in

organizations everywhere he lived, and was fully committed to community activities.

Jud was a keen sportsman, successfully participating in many sports throughout his

school and University days. Tennis and sailing were lifelong pursuits which he only

reluctantly gave up at 90. He treasured the early retirement years sailing the

Caribbean on Bynam’s Beauty, a 51ft sloop, with his wife, Betsy.

 

Later, he retired to Naples, FL and his beloved ancestral home in Annisquam, MA

where he gave of his devoted his time, energy, and life lessons to family and friends.

Many a novice sailor delights in stories of his expert tutelage! Jud also charmed his

friends and competitors at the bridge table.

 

Jud was blessed with a second marriage to his beloved Kari in 2011. They enjoyed

many active years together, sharing adventures in Hawaii, Vancouver, London, Italy,

and a favorite cruise in the Baltic. He enthusiastically supported the Annisquam

Village Church, the Annisquam Yacht Club, the Annisquam Library, and the Naples

Bath and Tennis Academy.

 

He filled his life with joy, service, generosity and love. For these and countless other

gifts of his life, his family will be eternally grateful.

 

A celebratory tribute to Jud was held during the Annisquam Village Church Service on

November 22nd. A private family interment will be held at a later date.

 

Memorial contributions in honor of Justin E. Gale may be made to:

The Annisquam Village Church
820 Washington Street
Gloucester, MA 01930

Giving

Or to:

Care Dimensions
75 Sylvan Street, B-102
Danvers, MA 01923
http://www.Giving.caredimensions.org

LOREN DOUCETTE BEAUTIFUL NEW BOOK AND CARD DRIVE-UP PICKUP SATURDAY

Loren Doucette is preparing for her stunning new Book and Card DRIVE-UP/PICK-UP 11/28 from 12-4 outside her studio at 97 East Main St Gloucester..

TONIGHT’S VIBRANT VIOLET SKY DRAMA SILHOUETTE LIGHTHOUSE SUNSET

Tonight’s sunset after the storm

I especially love the colors in the above image

WHEN SNOW BUNTINGS FILL THE SKIES!

At this time of year flocks of Snow Buntings small and large can be found at our local sandy beaches and rocky coastlines. I am finding them throughout my roaming range, from Plum Island to South Boston.

What is not to love about this sweetly charming tubby little songbird, including its name, Snow Bunting, and nickname Snowflake. I am often alerted to the Snow Buntings presence by their distinct and highly varied social chattering. More than once though I and it have been startled as one flutters away to avoid my footsteps. The alarmed Snow Bunting will call loudly, warning its flock mates of a human, and then they will all lift to the skies in a swirling unison of Snowflakes.

Snow Buntings especially love rocky crevices and outcroppings. They nest in rocky areas of the Arctic tundra and while resting and foraging along Massachusetts coastlines, Snow Buntings go largely undetected in the similarly colored rocks.

The conical -shaped bill of Snow Buntings tells us that they are are seed eaters and in autumn and winter, Massachusetts beaches provide a wealth of seed heads remaining on expired wildflowers and grasses. Beach stones, along with piles of beach debris, trap seeds and I have captured a number of photos where the foraging songbirds pop up between the rocks with a mouthful of seed.

Early morning invariably finds Snow Buntings sleeping amongst beach rocks. It is a joy to watch as they slowly awaken, stretching and floofing, before tumbling out in a burst of black, white, and rusty brown to forage for the day.

Remarkably, Snow Buntings are nocturnal migrants. They are able to detect the geomagnetic field of the Earth for guidance to their breeding and overwinter grounds. The orientation of the Snow Bunting during migration is independent of any visual cue.

The 40 plus year old annual Christmas Bird Count shows a 64 percent decline in the Snow Bunting population. Climate change and neonicotinoids (pesticides) are thought to be the main reason for the decline.

CAPE ANN BEACON WICKED LOCAL BEAUTY ON THE WING FEATURE STORY

Thank you so much to Joseph Barrett for the interview and feature story in the Cape Ann Beacon/Wicked Local for Beauty on the Wing!

Block #3 Beauty on the Wing: Life Story of the Monarch Butterfly
Today, November 21st 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Purchase tickets here:
https://bikff.org/schedule/

Can Ann Butterflies Featured at Festival

Gloucester filmmakers documentary featured at Boston International Kids Film Festival

Joseph Barrett

November 20, 2020

Gloucester resident Kim Smith will showcase her film on butterflies at the Boston International Kids Film Festival on Saturday, Nov. 21

Smith’s “Beauty on the Wing: Life Story of the Monarch Butterfly” is a 56-minute narrated film featuring visuals of Cape Ann and Mexico’s volcanic mountains.The film explores the life journey of the monarch butterfly from birth, and talks about environmental impacts that led to it being an endangered species.

“I think butterflies are beautiful. They make a garden come to life,” Smith said.

The picture will not only share information about monarchs, but will bring attention to other endangered species as well, said Smith.

The film is 10 years in the making, she said. The idea of the film came to her in 2006 when Smith was writing a book about monarch butterflies and taking pictures of them.

“It was a phenomenal migration that year and they just kept pouring in,” Smith said. “Over the years, I just kept at it.”

Smith bought a video camera and took it with her wherever she went.

Smith traveled to Mexico twice to film, and other parts of the project were shot in Gloucester. She said she enjoys incorporating Cape Ann because it’s a “special and unique place” that’s full of hardworking people.

“I love my community, I love the people in my community. It’s truly my home,” Smith said.

Smith then reached out to the Boston International Kids Film Festival, who helped her through the process of presenting her film.

The festival, taking place November 20-22, will be held virtually due to the coronavirus.

The festival includes 70 animated short and narrative films from 17 countries, all directed towards children.

Laura Azevedo is the executive director of the festival, who said it’s important to help creators get their stories out to the world.

“We’ve been a resource for independent filmmakers all over the country,” Azevedo said. “It’s a lot of fun and I’m looking forward to it.”

Azevedo said Smith’s film will do a great job connecting with children. Kids will get access to the movie and a zoom link to interact with Smith about butterflies and the filmmaking process.

“Kim’s film is an example of one where we work with schools as well,” Azevedo said.

Smith hasn’t just helped the environment on-screen. Kim Smith Designs was launched in 1985, and Smith has designed and maintained gardens in locations such as Gloucester, Cambridge, and Andover.

The award-winning landscape designer now brings her talents to the screen, and said she appreciates the Boston International Kids Film Festival for highlighting her findings.

“It’s grown and grown and grown over the past eight years,” Smith said. “Filmmakers are provided an opportunity to showcase their work.”

Her film will be during block #3 of the festival on Saturday, Nov. 21 at noon. To purchase tickets to the festival, visit this link: https://bikff.org/schedule/

“Filmmaking is one of the best ways in the world to communicate,” Smith said.

Joseph Barrett is a senior communication student at Endicott College.

WBUR’S ERIN TRAHAN HAS SOME TERRIFIC THINGS TO SAY ABOUT BEAUTY ON THE WING!!

Sheltering At Home, Families Get Creative With Entries For Boston International Kids Film Festival

The ARTery

November 17, 2020

By Erin Trahan

The Boston International Kids Film Festival (BIKFF) typically celebrates films made by, for, or about kids with an annual in-person festival. But this year, as with so much else, the festival had to pivot to a virtual presentation. The mostly short films can introduce kids to nature, help them think critically about race, or see what remote learning looks like in other parts of the world. Some are educational, some have a message, and plenty are just plain funny.

The festival was started eight years ago by the Filmmakers Collaborative, a Melrose-based organization that provides support to media makers. Executive director Laura Azevedo says that a lot of members made documentaries “with hopes of getting into schools or libraries and hoping young people would see them and discuss them.” BIKFF gave them, and youth filmmakers, an outlet for their work. The youth-made films quickly became the most popular, she says, because kids bring lots of friends and families into the theater.

Though this year the festivities will happen entirely online from Nov. 20-22, Azevedo still expects great attendance over the 10 blocks of film screenings. Since independent films are not rated, BIKFF breaks down viewing in various ways — by suggested viewer age, movie form and language. All of the films with English subtitles stream together, for example, as do all of the student-made films. At press time, each block will stream once, at a scheduled time, and is followed by a live Q&A.

…On Saturday, Nov. 21, in Block #3, the fest showcases an excellent pick for nature lovers. Screening at noon, Beauty on the Wing: Life Story of the Monarch Butterfly, gets up close and personal with the remarkable molting, migrating insect. With footage gathered over more than 10 years, some from her own back yard, Gloucester’s Kim Smith has become not just a nearly one-woman documentary crew but also a vocal Monarch expert and advocate.

Beauty on the Wing especially excels in patient, extreme close-ups of the caterpillar releasing its exoskeleton, as well as the butterflies sleeping and mating. In addition to its scheduled screening, schools can sign up to stream this documentary Nov. 16-Nov. 20 and also participate in a Q&A with the director.

READ the full article here

MONARCH DREAMS

So looking forward to tonight’s opening of the Boston International Kids Film Festival! The show’s opener is the outstanding film, The Biggest Little Farm, and there is a full lineup of over 65 films scheduled from now through Sunday. See the schedule and how to purchase tickets here.

Beauty on the Wing is playing during Block #3 at noon on Saturday, November 21st, followed by a Q and A.

Who doesn’t love The Cranberries “Dreams,” and one of my favorite covers of this beautiful song is by Mandy Lee and MisterWives. I edited a rough cut of Monarch Dreams this afternoon, with clips from Beauty on the Wing and set to “Dreams.” That my film is at last finding an audience is a dream come true for me.

I dream about Monarchs and other creatures nightly and am thinking about ways to make Monarch Dreams more dream-like, but in the meantime, I hope you enjoy this cut <3

 

MARITIME GLOUCESTER SCIENCE CENTER COMING SOON!

Have you heard? Maritime Gloucester has an innovative new space in the works, scheduled to open spring 2021!

Our newly redesigned Maritime Science Center will take some of our seasonal and underutilized space to create a cohesive year-round learning environment. This will include touch tanks, exhibit space and classroom space!

To learn more about this project and how you can help us reach our fundraising goals please visit our website! https://www.maritimegloucester.org/maritime-science-center

DON’T BE A TROGLODYTE!

DON’T BE A TROGLODYTE

WEAR A MASK!

If you read the wonderfully fun comic adventure series Tintin by Herge as a child, you may recall the drunken crusty Captain Archibald Haddock. One of his favorite curses was ‘Troglodyte.’ We used to read Tintin to our kids and of course they latched onto the word, always looking for a reason to call each other a Troglodyte (done in jest).

Folks who don’t wear masks and complain incessantly remind me of Troglodytes. A Troglodyte is defined as a prehistoric person who lived in a cave, a hermit, or a person who is being deliberately ignorant.

Someone who disputes the efficacy of mask wearing reminds me so much of a cave-dwelling willfully ignorant person, the very definition of a Troglodyte.

Later I learned there is a family of bird named Troglodytetidae (cave-dweller), so named because they forage in dark crevices. The Winter Wren (Troglodytes hiemalis) is a member of of Troglodytetidae and is seen year round on our shores.

Masks save lives, protecting you and your loved ones. However you define Troglodyte, whether bird, cave-dweller, or willfully ignorant human, please don’t be one and wear the darn mask!

Captain Archibald Haddock

CHECK OUT THE BOSTON INTERNATIONAL KIDS FILM FESTIVAL TRAILER HERE!

So looking forward to viewing all the films at the Boston International Kids Film Festival this weekend.  The BIKFF202 starts Friday night, November 20th, with a fantastic feature “The Biggest Little Farm.” For more information visit the BIKFF2020 website here.

Check out the BIKFF2020 trailer –

TICKETS FOR BEAUTY ON THE WING ON SALE NOW WITH Q. AND A. FOLLOWING THE SCREENING

Dear Friends,

In case you missed previous posts and emails, if you would like to see my Monarch Butterfly film documentary, please consider watching Saturday, November 21st, from the comfort and safety of your own home, via the Boston International Kids Film Festival and WGBH. 100 percent of the ticket sales goes to support this outstanding festival! There will be a Q and A following the screening, with me in the role of director, and hosted by WGBH and Filmmakers Collaborative.

With beautiful music by Jesse Cook and filmed on Cape Ann, Cape May, Santa Barbara, and the butterfly sanctuaries at Cerro Pelon and Angangueo, Mexico. Please share with friends and click the link below to learn more.

Block #3 Beauty on the Wing: Life Story of the Monarch Butterfly

Saturday, November 21st 12:00pm to 1:30pm

Purchase tickets here:

https://bikff.org/schedule/

TICKETS TO THE 8th ANNUAL Boston International Kids Film Festival NOW ON SALE
THIS YEAR IN PARTNERSHIP WITH GBH!
Screen both Professionally and Student-Made films!
Meet filmmakers from around the world!
Take a workshop in filmmaking or stop-motion animation!
ALL FROM THE COMFORT OF YOUR OWN HOME!
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20 – SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2020
FILM BLOCKS INCLUDE:
  • Family-Friendly Features
  • SHORT films for ages 10 and under
  • STUDENT-MADE films
  • FOREIGN LANGUAGE films
  • SHORT films for middle-schoolers ( and above!)
ALL GEARED TOWARDS KIDS!
$55 INDIVIDUAL FESTIVAL PASS ( watch everything!)
$75 FESTIVAL PASS two or more viewers ( honor system!)
$20 per film block

SNOWY OWLS ALERT!

Snowy Owls have returned to coastal Eastern Massachusetts. It’s exciting and wonderful and beautiful to see, but also I find it concerning with so many home, with time on their hands because of the pandemic, that we’ll see even greater crowds flushing the birds. That happened this weekend.Snowy Owl tracks in the sand

SNOWY OWL WATCHING ETIQUETTE: The following are some helpful tips for watching Snowy Owls. You will get better photographs and you won’t stress out the Snowies.

1. Watch from a safe and comfortable distance–comfortable for the bird that is. This is the number one rule. Young birds coming down from the Arctic are especially tolerant of people however crowds attract crows and raptors to their whereabouts and flushing a bird can cause them to fly into traffic.

2. Please keep children from throwing rocks towards the Snowy or anywhere within the vicinity of the Owl.

3. Please do not allow dogs to play near Snowies.

4. Slamming doors, radios blasting, barking dogs, and loud mufflers all stress Snowies.

5. Please do not try to take a selfie with the Snowy.

When Snowies are perching quietly, it’s not for our enjoyment (although beautiful) but because they are either resting or on the look out for their next meal.  After all, if they have a good hunting season and survive the winter, perhaps they will return the following year.

Below is an excerpt from a five part series about a beautiful Snowy Owl nicknamed Hedwig. The series was designed for kids especially and is free to educators to share with students. To see all five parts visit the Snowy Owl Film Project here

A Snowy Owl Comes to Cape Ann

 

 

 

AN EAR-FULL OF CEDAR WAXWINGS! ALONG WITH MERLINS AND HAWKS ON THE HUNT

During the last weeks of summer, I was blessed with the great good fortune to come across a flock of Cedar Waxwings. Everyday I followed their morning antics as they socialized, foraged, preened, and was even “buzzed” several times when making too quick a movement or crunched on a twig too loudly for their liking. They were actually remarkably tolerant of my presence but as soon as another person or two appeared on the path, they quickly departed. I think that is often the case with wildlife; one human is tolerable, but two of us is two too many. 

The Cedar Waxwings were seen foraging on wildflower seeds and the insects attracted, making them harder to spot as compared to when seen foraging at berries on trees branches. A flock of Cedar Waxwings is called a “museum” or an “ear-full.” The nickname ear-full is apt as they were readily found each morning by their wonderfully soft social trilling.  When you learn to recognize their vocalizations, you will find they are much easier to locate.

These sweet songbirds are strikingly beautiful. Dressed in a black mask that wraps around the eyes, with blue, yellow, and Mourning Dove buffy gray-brown feathers, a cardinal-like crest atop the head, and brilliant red wing tips, Cedar Waxwings are equally as beautiful from the front and rear views.

Cedar Waxwings really do have wax wings; the red wing tips are a waxy secretion. At first biologist thought the red tips functioned to protect the wings from wear and tear, but there really is no evidence of that. Instead, the red secondary tips appear to be status signals that function in mate selection. The older the Waxwing, the greater the number of waxy tips. Birds with zero to five are immature birds, while those with more than nine are thought to be older.

Waxwings tend to associate with other waxwings within these two age groups. Pairs of older birds nest earlier and raise more fledglings than do pairs of younger birds. The characteristic plumage is important in choosing a mate within the social order of the flock.

By mid-September there were still seeds and insects aplenty in the wildflower patch that I was filming at when the beautiful Waxwings abruptly departed for the safety of neighboring treetops. Why do I write “safety?” I believe they skeedaddled because a dangerous new raptor appeared on the scene. More falcon-like than hawk, the mystifying bird sped like a torpedo through the wildflower patch and swooped into the adjacent birch tree where all the raptors like to perch. It was a Merlin! And the songbird’s mortal enemy. Cooper’s and Sharp-shinned Hawks, too, had been hunting the area, but the other hawks did not elicit the same terror as did the Merlin.

Merlin, Eastern Point

Cooper’s and Sharp-shinned Hawks

A small falcon, the Merlin’s short wings allow it to fly fast and hard. The Merlin is often referred to as the “thug” of the bird world for its ability to swoop in quickly and snatch a songbird out of the air. The day after the Merlin appeared, I never again found the Waxwings foraging in the wildlflowers, only in the tree tops.

Within the sociable ear-full, Waxwings take turns foraging. Some perch and preen, serving as sentries while flock-mates dine. Cedar Waxwings mostly eat berries and they love a wide variety. The first half of their name is derived from one of their favorite fruits, the waxy berries of cedar trees. During the breeding season, Waxwings add insects to their diets. Hatchlings are fed insects, gradually switching to berries.

Juvenile Cedar Waxwing with adult Waxwings

If you would like to attract Cedar Waxwings  to your garden here is a handy list that I compiled of some of their most favorite fruits and berries –

Dogwood, Juniper, Chokecherry, Cedar, Honeysuckle, Holy, Crabapple, Hawthorn, Serviceberry, Mulberry, Raspberry, Grapes, and Strawberry. Cedar Waxwings are becoming increasingly more prevalent in backyards because people are planting more ornamental flowering and fruiting trees.

BONAPARTE’S GULLS AND BRACE COVE SUNRISE

Beautiful Bonaparte’s dancing in the waves at sunrise, Brace Cove

PIPING PLOVER ADORABLENESS OVERLOAD

This past week I have been reorganizing and adding new photos to my presentation about Piping Plovers. I came across these sweet scenes that were in my photo library from the past summer. There are so many photos that never see the light of day! Next week I will be presenting the PiPl program to the Junior League of Boston and it is the first time doing this program virtually. We’ll see how it goes.

Tender moments

There’s a lot going on in this nest! A twelve hour old chick, a chick that is a few hours old, a minutes-old newborn hatchling (still wet and with its leg akimbo), and an egg beginning to crack.

Last night I gave my first virtual film screening for BotWing. There were some initial glitches, but all in all, the screening went very well!

We all are frustrated by this new virtual reality. People are sociable beings. It’s much more meaningful and enjoyable to give programs in person and to create live events. Thank goodness though for virtuality because there just is no other safe way of doing things. I am just grateful to be alive and have immense hope for when the pandemic is truly under control we can come out and see our friends and loved ones. Stay strong friends, it’s going to be a  long winter. 

TONIGHT FIRST LOCAL ZOOM FILM SCREENING OF BEAUTY ON THE WING!

Tonight I am presenting a Zoom screening/presentation of Beauty on the Wing to a private group. The screening was scheduled a year ago, before covid, and was planed to be live. The organizers have been super throughout the planning changes. This is the first time doing a screening not through a film festival and I am on pins and needles. I hope they love the film and that there are no technical glitches! If all goes well, I would love to do more of these and will let you know. <3

For information on how to see Beauty on the Wing via WGHB and the Boston International Kids Film Festival on Saturday, November 21st, please follow this link here.

 

LAST LIGHT OF DAY

Schooner Adventure, fishing boat, and the UU Church

TICKETS FOR BEAUTY ON THE WING ON SALE NOW!

Dear Friends,

Although not the gala premiere event we had envisioned pre-covid, if you would like to see my Monarch Butterfly film documentary, please consider watching Saturday, November 21st, from the comfort and safety of your own home, via the Boston International Kids Film Festival and WGBH. 100 percent of the ticket sales goes to support this outstanding festival. I hope you can come! With music by Jesse Cook. Filmed on Cape Ann, Santa Barbara, Cape May, and the butterfly sanctuaries at Cerro Pelon and Angangueo, Mexico. Please share and click the link below to learn more.

Block #3 Beauty on the Wing: Life Story of the Monarch Butterfly

Saturday, November 21st 12:00pm to 1:30pm

Purchase tickets here:

https://bikff.org/schedule/

TICKETS TO THE 8th ANNUAL Boston International Kids Film Festival NOW ON SALE
THIS YEAR IN PARTNERSHIP WITH GBH!
Screen both Professionally and Student-Made films!
Meet filmmakers from around the world!
Take a workshop in filmmaking or stop-motion animation!
ALL FROM THE COMFORT OF YOUR OWN HOME!
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20 – SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2020
FILM BLOCKS INCLUDE:
  • Family-Friendly Features
  • SHORT films for ages 10 and under
  • STUDENT-MADE films
  • FOREIGN LANGUAGE films
  • SHORT films for middle-schoolers ( and above!)
ALL GEARED TOWARDS KIDS!
$55 INDIVIDUAL FESTIVAL PASS ( watch everything!)
$75 FESTIVAL PASS two or more viewers ( honor system!)
$20 per film block

RAINBOW SUNSET OVER GLOUCESTER HARBOR

Tonight’s glorious rainbow sunset to match this most glorious of new days <3

Station break from election coverage, brought to you by this morning’s visiting Red Fox youngster!

Back again – we think he is sleeping in our backyard! I’m in love with this adorable face!Red Fox 

We interrupt your nail-biting election results newsfeed to bring you BUFFLEHEADS!

A brief break from election coverage –

Buffleheads may be the tiniest diving duck found in North America; they are also the spunkiest, and quite possibly the cutest. Buffleheads, along with their waterside courtship antics, have returned in full force to Cape Ann’s shores, having spent the breeding season in central Canada. Some will migrate as far south as central Mexico and lucky for us, we will have a population that remains all winter.Male Bufflehead

The English name is a combination of buffalo and head, referring to the bulbous head shape. This is most noticeable when the male puffs out the feathers on his head, greatly increasing how large his head appears to competing males and potential mates.

The genus name, Bucephala, is derived from Ancient Greek boukephalos, “bullheaded”, from bous, “bull ” and kephale, “head”, again a reference to the bulbous head shape of the species. The species name albeola is from Latin albus, white.

WONDERFULLY FUN HALLOWEEN WEATHER WEEKEND – SNOW STORM, FULL MOON, BLUE MOON, SEA SMOKE,

No matter how your candidates fared, we can still all rejoice in the beauty found on Cape Ann –Halloween weekend brought a flower-melting snow storm, surfers in sea smoke at daybreak, wildy winds, Full Blue Halloween Moon, beautiful sunrise and sunsets

Seed pods of Stewart psuedocamelia

Brace Cove- Back Shore sea smoke surfers sunrise

Our little snow-eater

 

Blue Full Halloween Hunter Moon