Category Archives: Beauty of Cape Ann

POSTING MONDAY – BEAUTY BY THE SEA EPISODE #8 and PIPING PLOVERS MATING!

Slight delay in posting episode 8 but lots of good things to talk about, including excellent clips of Piping Plovers mating as our Piping Plover Chronicles continues. See you then

Beautiful rainbow sherbet skies sunrise sequence Friday morning

HAS ANYONE SEEN MONARCHS YET?

Although Monarchs have been sited as far north as 46 degrees, it is still very early for us even though we are at 43 degrees latitude because we are so far east. Please write if you see one in your garden. And feel free to send a photo. I will post photos here. Thank you so much!

Keep your eyes peeled, especially on emerging milkweed shoots. In the photos below, Monarchs are drinking nectar from, depositing eggs on, and also mating on the milkweed plants. Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) and Marsh Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) are the two most productive milkweeds for the Northeast region.

BEAUTIFUL GOLDEN FEATHERS OF THE NORTHERN FLICKER

BLUETS AND NORTHERN FLICKER – A FAVORITE BIRD AND WILDFLOWER PHOTOGRAPHED TOGETHER!

A chance moment with the elusive male Northern Flicker and a patch of Bluets.

I stopped to take a photo of the Bluets and the Flicker flew onto the scene. My lucky day!

Northern Flickers are a large species of woodpecker. The Northern Flicker found in the eastern half of the country has shafts of yellow on their flight feathers. I would have set my shutter speed for a fast action capture if there had been time but it was only half a minute that he stayed scrounging at the base of the Bluets.

Even though the flying photos are out of focus, you can see the beautiful yellow shafts as the bird takes flight.

Bluets are a lovely native wildflower native to the eastern portion of North America.  The Bluet’s tiny florets range in color from almost white to a dreamy azure blue. Also called Quaker Ladies, the little bunches “quake” in the seasonal breeze! The sweet petite blossoms attract Little Carpenter Bees, Green Metallic Bees, small butterflies, and the Meadow Fritillary Butterfly (Boloria bellona). Both nectar and pollen are the pollinator’s floral reward!

Both the male and female eastern Northern Flicker have the v-shaped red feather patterning. The female lacks the black whisker, visible in the upper photos.

 

BEAUTIFUL MEMORIAL FRIDAY AT GOOD HARBOR BEACH!

People and wildlife waiting for sunrise

From what I could see and for the most part, people were social distancing while enjoying a gorgeous day in the sunshine.

THE OPEN DOOR’S WONDERFULLY SWEET FUN FUNDRAISER- #mybowlathome #communitystrong

Let’s have some fun! We can’t meet for Empty Bowl Dinner this month, but you can #ShowUsYourBowls Take a picture with your favorite empty bowl (or bowls!) and share them with your friends and family. Get creative and crazy! Bowls are not just for soup–what’s in your bowl? Set the table. Strike a pose. Don’t forget to tag us with @theopendoorma #MyBowlAtHome #CommunityStrong

If so inclined, please DONATE HERE

Every bowl has a story. The bowl photos were borrowed from ceramics artist Marty Morgan, one of the founders of the Empty Bowl Project.

 

 

 

BABY SEA URCHINS AT GLOUCESTER MARINE GENOMICS INSTITUTE!

During these days of isolation, GMGI staff have been working behind the scenes to keep their colony of sea urchins at 417 Main Street happy and healthy. They are excited to announce that last week, GMGI Scientist Amanda Baryshyan welcomed the arrival of several baby sea urchins to the GMGI family!

To learn more about Gloucester Marine Genomics Institute, visit their website here.

Mommy Sea Urchin releasing eggs 

Fertilized eggs

Newly developing embryos with 8 or 16 cells

Two days later…a fully formed sea urchin larva! Amazing!

CHECK OUT THIS AWESOME VIDEO ABOUT CEDAR ROCK GARDENS FROM NOFA!