Tag Archives: Gloucester Harbor

December Frost Moon Over Gloucester Harbor

One more photo from December’s Frost Moon at dawn. The moon was rapidly loosing color in the sun’s first light, but still beautiful I think.

Saturated Sunset Over Gloucester Harbor

Gorgeous sunset over Gloucester Harbor and Rocky Neck, with the colors of the sky flowing from red hot reds and oranges to soothing shades of violet pinks and blues. 


Within moments, the sky’s hues changed from orange to violet. FV Pioneer in the foreground. 

Sky Drama Over Gloucester Harbor

Layers of of fast moving April storm clouds swirling over the Harbor last night.

Click image to view larger panorama larger

Smith’s Cove Rocky Neck

Gloucester’s Inner Harbor at Daybreak

sunrise-gloucester-city-skyline-copyright-kim-smithThe light oftentimes glows warm golden pink over the Harbor late in the day, at sunset. On my way to photograph Niles Pond Saturday morning, it was surprisingly beautiful to see overhanging the Harbor wispy vertical pink clouds.

I love the time change with the sun rising an hour earlier because I can get out and film before the work day begins. Lately we have been treated to extra amazingly gorgeous and sumptuous sunrises and sunsets!

sunrise-gloucester-harbor-november-5-2016-2-copyrightt-kim-smith
Same morning, the view looking towards Smith’s Cove

Nightfall

Beautiful from every vantage point all around the harbor. Click panoramic images to see full size.gloucester-harbor-sunset-copyright-kim-smithgloucesterskyline-nightfall-1-copyright-kim-smithgloucester-skyline-nightfall-copyright-kim-smith

Days end

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Like Breath on Glass, or Living in a Whistler Moment

gloucester-harbor-nocturne-copyright-kim-smithJames McNeill Whistler once said “Paint should not be applied thick. It should be like breath on the surface of a pane of glass.” My question is, which came first, the “soft paintings” of the later half of the 19th and early 20th century or soft focus photos? Knowing that Edward Steichen transitioned from painting to photography, its not hard to imagine that Whistler and Innes were also using photography as a tool.