Category Archives: Home and Garden

STELLAR LUMINOSITY

Luminous
1. emitting or reflecting glowing or suffused light. Also, clear, enlightening.

Spring Ephemeral garden at the Mary Prentiss Inn, Cambridge

One of the ‘blue’ lilacs, both heavenly and heavily scented

My all time favorite narcissus, mostly for its fabulous fragrance, but also because it is super long blooming.

APPLE BLOSSOM SUNRISE

The view out our bedroom window at sunrise this morning, before all was overtaken by (more) rain clouds.

BTW, the RTHummingbirds and Orioles are loving the nectar from our crabapple and flowering fruit tree blossoms 🙂

THREE HUMMINGBIRDS IN OUR GARDEN TODAY

Shortly before it began raining this afternoon, my husband called to me to the garden to have a look see. Three male Ruby-throated Hummingbirds were zinging about, drinking nectar from the flowers and fearlessly whizzing by each other in territorial displays. The tiny boys were mostly interested in our beautiful old Japanese flowering quince ‘Toyo-nishiki’  (Chaenomoles speciosa).  They were also investigating the flowering pear tree and almost-ready to bloom crabapples, but not nearly as much so as the quince.

I hope to see them again on a brighter day, the male’s beautiful red gorget (throat patch) flashes much more brilliantly in the sunshine.

Providing a continuously blooming array of nectar rich flowers, from spring through late summer, will encourage RTHummingbirds to nest nearby and you may even see the fledglings later in the season. You will probably never see the nest as it is only as big as one half a walnut shell, and the eggs only pearl-sized 🙂

CEDAR ROCK GARDENS, WOLF HILL, AND MARSHALL’S FARM STAND ARE FULLY STOCKED AND READY FOR MOTHER’S DAY!

While out and about organizing jobs for my landscape design clients with my newest assistant Charlotte, we were planning to take more photos, but it was too dreary. Believe me when I write, all three of our fantastic local nurseries are bursting with beautiful plants and garden ornaments that would make wonderful gifts for Moms, and all the special ladies in your life. The weather forecast for tomorrow is mostly sunny and mid-fifties, perfect weather for plant shopping.

New assistant, Charlotte, and best mother’s helper, our Radio Flyer COLLAPSIBLE wagon!

MOTHER’S DAY WEEKEND HOURS

CEDAR ROCK GARDENS

    SATURDAY 8AM TO 4PM

    SUNDAY 9AM TO 3PM

WOLF HILL

    SATURDAY 8AM TO 6PM

    SUNDAY 9AM TO 4PM

MARSHALL’S FARM STAND

    SATURDAY AND SUNDAY 9AM TO 6PM

WHEN AT MARSHALL’S FARM STAND, STOP IN TO SAY HI TO ANGIE’S ALPACAS, PERRY THE PEACOCK, HORSES, GOATS, GEESE, AND DUCKS. KIDS ARE WELCOME!

BLACK EARTH COMPOST – SIMPLY THE BEST ON THE PLANET!

I cannot say enough good things about BLACK EARTH COMPOST and the amazing guys, Andrew and Connor, who provide this fantastic product. My client’s gardens have never looked as lush and beautiful since I began strictly only using Black Earth Compost to replenish the soil.

Andrew even delivers to my butterfly and ABC gardens at Philips Andover. Thank you Black Earth for making such a great product!

Black Earth Compost not only makes a great product, they provide residential, commercial, and municipal compost pickup. Go here to learn more about their excellent services.

Nature rarer uses yellow

Nature rarer uses yellow
Than another hue;
Saves she all of that for sunsets,—
Prodigal of blue,

Spending scarlet like a woman,
Yellow she affords
Only scantly and selectly,
Like a lover’s words.

Emily Dickinson

Photos from the planters that surround the Black Sheep Restaurant at the Kendall Hotel. We made an extra beautiful mix this year, and many of the varieties are fragrant. The weather was kind to tulips and daffodils this past winter. The nicest thing though is when city dwelling passers-by stop to take photos and tell you how happy the flowers make them feel 🙂

Black Sheep Restaurant and Bar at The Kendall Hotel

350 Main Street

Cambridge, MA 02142

For reservations call 617-577-1300

WINTER ROBINS HAVE RETURNED AND THEY ARE RIGHT ON SCHEDULE!

Their shadows in flight crisscrossing the light through my office window, I look up to see one feather-fluffed fellow sitting on a crabapple branch, gazing right back at me. I wonder, if I silently and cautiously open the window, will he fly in?

It is so very cold out doors. The flock seems more weary than in past years. One sits on the ground outside the window, barely moving aside when I walk down the garden path; another is half asleep in the holly limb overhead. There are fewer, too, perhaps only eight to ten when often we see several dozen. On this coldest of January days, it must be difficult to keep warm, especially as there are no little fish to catch along the frozen sea’s edge to warm their bellies.

This one was so worn out, he sat in the snow beneath the holly tree, eating what the other Robins dropped on the ground.

The winter Robins arrive to our garden every year in January, nearly to the day (today, January 21st). Our garden is a postage stamp but we have planted it richly for the songbirds. The pair of ‘Dragon Lady’ holly trees hold their berries for the Robins, the crabapples have yet to be sampled, the winterberry is still ripe with fruit, and the tiny rosehips of the climbing white rose are beckoning.

We’re fortunate that on Cape Ann many American Robins nest and migrate along our shores. Some Robins live here all the year round; some arrive in springtime, having spent the winter further south in parts warmer; and some–the ones I like to call winter Robins–arrive in January, from parts further north. We are like their Bermuda, and they are here to feed on wild fruits and berries, as well as small fish fry and fingerlings, and mollusks.

Rime-sweetened rosehips