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MONARCHS ON THE WING

Kim Smith is an award winning documentary filmmaker, environmental conservationist, photojournalist, author, illustrator, and an award winning landscape designer. For over twenty years, she has taught people how to turn their backyards and public spaces into pollinator habitat gardens, utilizing primarily North American native wildflowers, trees, shrubs, and vines. Kim’s programs and events are developed from her documentary nature films and landscape design work.

Her most recent feature length documentary Beauty on the Wing: Life Story of the Monarch Butterfly,  currently airing on PBS, has won numerous awards and recognition, including Best Documentary at the Boston International Kids Festival, Best Feature Film at the Providence Children’s Film Festival, the environmental award at the Toronto International Women Film Festival, and Gold at the Spotlight Documentary Awards. One of the greatest hopes for the film is that it would be inspirational and educational to both adults and young people and we are overjoyed Beauty on the Wing is finding its audience.

PIPING PLOVER MIGRATING THROUGH CAPE ANN! #ploverjoyed

Very late  in the day Thursday, September 29th, while checking on Monarchs, and other travelers, a new friend pointed out a Piping Plover foraging in the seaweed at Brace Cove. I zipped down to the beach and sure enough, there was a very shy PiPl foraging alongside Semipalmated Plovers and sandpipers of several different species. He/she had a fairly steady gait so I am certain it wasn’t Hip Hop, although it was a little challenging to see in the super thick seaweed. And, too, this PiPl was extremely skittish of larger birds flying overhead, displaying an usual way of crouching its upper body and holding its tail end up high, a behavior not shared with Hip Hop.

I returned to Brace Cove early the following morning and the traveling PiPl had departed overnight.

I am posting this information especially for fans of Hip Hop to show that it is not unheard of for stragglers to have not yet left our region. It’s evolution and nature’s way for creatures to remain and depart over a period of time, to ensure survival of the species. If all the Monarchs and all the PiPlovers migrated at precisely the same time, one storm could wipe out the entire species.

Safe travels to all our little migrating friends. Hopefully they are finding shelter from the storm.

GOODNIGHT MONARCHS!

A silhouette of Monarchs aligned against the night sky.

On chilly or windy evenings, Monarchs often roost close together in trees. They tend to prefer native trees such as this native cherry tree.

CONGRATULATIONS TO ALEXA NIZIAK, LOCAL ACTRESS (AND PIPING PLOVER AMBASSADOR), FOR HER STEVEN KING FILM NETFLIX PREMIERE!!

Congratulations and wonderful wishes to Alexa Niziak! Her latest film project, Mr. Harrigan’s Phone, premiered last night in Hollywood. Alexa is also a full time student at the outstanding NYU Tish School of the Arts. She didn’t want to miss classes so Alexa flew out to LA just for the night to attend the premiere.

Alexa is a Rockport resident. You may recall that she was also one of our super Piping Plover ambassadors, along with her beautiful Mom Paula. They had originally volunteered to help with the Cape Hedge chicks but after all four chicks perished, the two joined us at Good Harbor Beach. They are one of our most kind-hearted and dedicated and we were so grateful to have had their help this summer. We may lose Alexa to her flourishing career (we sure hope not), but if so, success could not happen to a nicer person.

Alexa is a gifted dancer, actress, and singer. She has performed on Broadway (the Tony-award winning Matilda the Musical), Off-Broadway, and television shows such as “Orange is the New Black.”  To read more about Alexa, visit her website here.

Alexa Niziak (second from left) in Mr. Harrigan’s Phone

Just in time for Halloween, Mr. Harrigan’s Phone is a super spooky thriller. Husband Tom is a big Steven King so I nabbed a copy off his bookshelf and read it on the plane to Ohio. I cannot wait to see Alexa in the film. She plays Margie, the lead character’s best friend.

We’re so proud of you Alexa!!! xo

A boy and an aging billionaire bond over books — and their first iPhones. But when the older man passes, their mysterious connection refuses to die. From Ryan Murphy, Blumhouse and Stephen King comes a supernatural coming-of-age story, starring Donald Sutherland and Jaeden Martell. Written and directed for the screen by John Lee Hancock.

READ MORE HERE

CAR TALK WITH CHARLOTTE – LIVIN’ THE DREAM

Driving in the car with Charlotte while we sing and converse, there is never a dull moment. On a recent trip to Russell Orchards traveling along Rt. 133 in Essex –

Me – Look at that beautiful field of goldenrod honey.

Charlotte – Monarchs must live there Mimi (normal tone of voice). Then she shouts, Monarchs livin’ the dream in the goldenrod patch!

Kid’s brains are endlessly making wonderful connections. She learned that expression from her Bops (my husband Tom), I think. He is always saying thing like “we live in paradise,”, or “we’re living the dream.” It was just funny thinking about Monarchs in the context of living the dream in a field of wildflowers, but of course they are 🙂

HOLIDAY DELIGHTS IS BACK IN GLOUCESTER AND LOOKING TO CAST!

Director Heidi Dallin shares –

JOIN THE CAST!!

A Cape Ann Holiday Tradition Returns!

Holiday Delights

Back on Stage in Gloucester

The Cape Ann YMCA presents Holiday Delights, the beloved holiday production. Registration is now open for young people age 6 to 17 to perform in Holiday Delights. Set in Gloucester, Holiday Delights is a festive evening of stories, music and dance recounting the special traditions that other cultures and families experience as seen through a young child’s magical journey on Christmas Eve to discover what is really important during the holiday season. Young people can learn the basics of professional theatre as well as be a part of a Cape Ann Holiday tradition. “There are terrific roles for young actors of all ages! All actors that register will be cast in the production,” says YMCA of the North Shore Theatre Specialist and Holiday Delights Director Heidi Dallin. Rehearsals will be at the Cape Ann YMCA and the schedule is flexible. Dallin has assembled a YMCA Theatre Team that includes West Parish Elementary School Music teacher Rin Wolter as Music Director, Manchester native Jenny Hersey as Stage Manager, and former Holiday Delights cast member and recent college graduate TS Burnham as Choreographer/Costume Designer. Performances are December 9 at 7pm; December 10 at 2pm and December 11 at 2pm at the American Legion, 8 Washington Street, Gloucester , MA. To join the cast, go to Register For Programs at www.northshoreymca.org and search for Holiday Delights. For further information and questions, contact Heidi Dallin at dallinh@northshoreymca.org or 978-729-1094.

Photo: Holiday Delights 2021 Performance Workshop in rehearsal

IN DEFENSE OF LITERARY FREEDOM AND FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION – FRIDAY AT GLOUCESTER CITY HALL!!

Gloucester stands in solidarity with Salman Rushdie

SEVEN SUNS GALLERY IS HOSTING THEIR FIRST GUEST ARTIST RECEPTION!

Gallery owner and artist extraordinaire Loren Doucette shares the following –

Hi All,

Seven Suns Gallery is happy to announce our first guest artist reception as our Fall Event.
Please help us in welcoming artist Matthew Billey and his “Red Sun” series. His work will be on display from Oct. 7- Nov. 25 here at the gallery.
 
Guest Artist Matthew Billey showing at Seven Suns Gallery Oct. 7 – Nov. 25
Artist Reception: Friday, Oct. 14 from 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Matthew Billey has been a traditional wooden boat builder for the last 25 years. He has a special interest in Scandinavian designs and construction methods. Matt built and lives aboard his 27’ Danish Cutter, Jette. She appears frequently as the main subject matter in his artwork. His expertise in designing, building and sailing wooden sailboats lends a discerning eye when portraying them accurately in their element.
His 7 year old daughter, Naomi, was a major influence in getting him started as a painter. Since the Spring of 2022, he has made several works based on his interest in metaphysics, global ascension, astrology, perception beyond the ordinary five senses and spirituality. He merges that interest with his passion for landscapes and boats. Matt’s latest body of work, The “Red Sun” series, showcases 7 tall vertical paintings; all acrylic on wood and all fantastical in nature.
The “Red Sun” series and others of Matt’s paintings will be featured as a Fall Event at Loren Doucette Studio at Seven Suns Gallery from Oct. 7 – Nov. 25th. The guest artist reception will be Friday, Oct. 14 from 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm and is free and open to the public. Seven Suns Gallery is located at 48 Bearskin Neck in Rockport, Ma. and is open 7 days a week from 10:00 am – 6:00 pm.
Warm wishes,
Loren


Loren Doucette Studio at Seven Suns Gallery

48 Bearskin Neck, Rockport, MA 01966
(978)-879-6588

WILD MUSTANG BEAUTY, MONARCH MIGRATION, AND HIP HOP!

Dear Friends,

While I began writing this note yesterday morning and was looking out my office window, there were Monarchs drinking nectar from the Zinnias in the front flower border and Monarchs nectaring at the New England Asters around back. The migration is underway, with small assemblages here and there. I’m keeping my hopes up that we will see a greater influx in the coming days. And hopefully, too, the drought has not too badly harmed the Monarchs as there seems to have been enough moisture in the air that native wildflowers such as goldenrods and asters are blooming.

It was a good year for many species of butterflies in our garden. Here is a short video set to Camile Saint-Saens “Carnival of the Animals,” organized for a request for footage by a news organization:Monarchs and Friends in the Summer Garden #plantforthepollinators

On another note, the Shalin Liu and the Boston Film Festival are screening a new film titled Wild Beauty: Mustang Spirit of the West on Friday evening. This screening is free and open to the public. Here is a link to the trailer: Wild Beauty: Mustang Spirit of the WestThe footage of the wild horses looks stunning. The film documents that wild horses are disappearing. You can find more information on my website here, too much for an email.

Our sweet little Hip Hop has not been seen for several days (as of this writing), but as Piping Plover Ambassador Deb writes, he has a Houdini-like way of disappearing and reappearing. Hopefully, he has departed. I am not sure if I sent this along to you – Ethan Forman from the GTimes wrote a fantastic article about our GHB Plovers. You can find the story here: Best Year Ever for Plovers at Good Harbor Beach.

I was so happy to read in the Gloucester Times that Mayor Verga’s new beach reservation system is a success, not only for the City, but because an interesting outcome is that I think the reservation system also helped the PiPls. Folks with reservations weren’t desperate to get to the beach by 7am and took their time arriving. The net result was that the wildlife that finds shelter and sustenance on the beach was less disturbed and could forage in relative peace. The new system appears to be a win for all!

In the sixties with mostly sunny skies this weekend. There are many creatures migrating along the coast and through New England currently. I believe I saw a pair of American Golden Plovers but haven’t had time to check my footage to verify 100 percent. I hope you have a chance to get out and enjoy the predicted beautiful weather and see some wildlife.

Warmest wishes,

Kim

Charlotte’s first day of kindergarten with a newly emerged Monarch to send her off – her idea to accessorize 🙂

FREE SCREENING AT THE SHALIN LIU – WILD BEAUTY: MUSTANG SPIRIT OF THE WEST! #IStandWithWildHorses

Robin Dawson, Director of the Boston Film Festival, shares that the newly released documentary Wild Beauty: Mustang Spirit of the West is airing at the Shalin Liu on Friday evening, September 23rd, at 7:30 pm. The cinematography looks exquisite in the trailer. There will be a Q and A with the Director Ashley Avis following the screening.

“An immersive journey into the world of wild horses, Wild Beauty illuminates both the profound beauty, and desperate plight currently faced by the wild horses in the Western United States. Filmmaker Ashley Avis (Disney’s Black Beauty) and crew go on a multi-year expedition to uncover the truth in hopes to protect them, before wild horses disappear forever.”

The Wild Beauty Foundation

Do you stand with wild horses? Few people know that wild horses are fast disappearing across the Western United States, losing their freedom and their families – in a fight over land and special interests.

Filmmaker Ashley Avis (Disney’s BLACK BEAUTY) and crew go on a multi-year expedition to show the world what is happening, before wild horses disappear forever.

Show your support on social media. Tag your lawmakers with #IStandWithWildHorses

Learn more, our help our cause:

www.wildbeautyfoundation.org 

Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/wildbeautyspirit

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/

WildBeautyFoundation Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/wildbeautyorg

NEW SHORT FILM: MONARCHS AND FRIENDS IN THE SUMMER GARDEN #plantforthepollinators

The zinnia and milkweed patch has been attracting a magical assemblage of butterflies, hummingbirds, bees, hover flies, and other insects throughout the summer. Stay tuned for part two coming soon – Monarchs and Friends in Marsh and Meadow!

Plant and they will come!

Monarchs and friends in the mid-summer garden. A host of pollinators finds sustenance in our zinnia and milkweed patch.

Cast

Monarch
Tiger Swallowtail
American Lady
Black Swallowtail
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Clouded Sulphur
Cabbage White
Various bees and skippers

Zinnia elegans
Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca)
Whorled Milkweed (Asclepias verticilllata)
Phlox paniculata

“Carnival of the Animals”
Camille Saint-Saens
Philharmonia Orchestra

Part two coming soon – Monarchs and Friends in Marsh and Meadow!

 

“BIRDS AND POETRY” WITH AUTHOR AND BROOKLINE BIRD CLUB DIRECTOR JOHN NELSON!

You are invited to join Brookline Bird Club director John Nelson at 7-9 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 24 for a walk around Gloucester’s Eastern Point–the opening event of the Dry Salvages Festival 2022: A Celebration of T. S. Eliot.

We will look for birds around Eliot’s childhood patch, with commentary about Eliot’s bird poems.

The event is free and open to the public. Free parking at the Beauport lot at 75 Eastern Point Blvd. Participation limited. Registration by email is required: tseliotfestival@gmail.com.

Go, said the bird, for the leaves were full of children,
Hidden excitedly, containing laughter.
Go, go, go, said the bird: human kind
Cannot bear very much reality.
Time past and time future
What might have been and what has been
Point to one end, which is always present.”

T. S. Eliot Four Quartets

John Nelson is  the author of Flight Calls: Exploring Massachusetts Through Birds

Photos of Eliot on boat, view of harbor from Eliot house

Some wild creatures you may see on your walk –

PIPLS IN THE GLOUCESTER TIMES – BEST YEAR EVER!

Good morning PiPl Friends!

Please check out today’s Gloucester Times for a terrific article about our GHB PiPls, written by Ethan Forman. https://www.gloucestertimes.com/news/best-year-ever-for-plovers-at-good-harbor-beach/article_cba646a6-32d4-11ed-ba55-1fc4ad06ff8b.html

Ethan, Paul Bilodeau (the Times photographer), and I met last week at GHB. PiPl Ambassador Susan was out looking for HipHop that morning, too, and she stopped by during the interview. Ethan mentioned years ago he had written articles about the Plovers on Plum Island. He asked lots of great questions about our GHB Plovers and he’s such an excellent writer, I felt very good about the interview. Carolyn Mostello, our Massachusetts state waterbird biologist, provided a very thoughtful quote for the article. I was hoping to show Ethan and Paul Hip Hop that day, but he was doing his invisible act. Everyday I am hopeful he has departed however, as of yesterday, he was still here.

Hip Hop eleven weeks old September 12

I couldn’t find Hip Hop this morning feeding with the Semipalmated Plovers and Killdeers at the Creek, or at the front of the beach. The wind was blowing in great gusts and he knows where all the best locations are to get out of the wind. Hoping for the possibility that he joined the many travelers during last night’s massive migration

Semipalms at the Creek this morning

Thank you to all our super Ambassadors. We could not have had our “Best Year Ever” without each and every one of you and your tremendous gifts of time and patience. 
Have a super day and enjoy this exquisite weather!
xxKim

‘Best year ever’ for plovers at Good Harbor Beach

Efforts to protect piping plovers nesting at the popular Good Harbor Beach this summer paid off: Between two pairs nesting, there were seven eggs. Of those, six chicks hatched, and five chicks fledged.

“It’s our best year ever,” said Kim Smith, who heads up the group Piping Plover Ambassadors at the beach.

And the success here of the piping plovers — a threatened species — this summer revolved around the storyline of two handicapped shorebirds, a mom who had lost her foot but still successfully hatched a clutch of four eggs, and her chick dubbed “Hip Hop”, who had a lame right foot and was slow to develop.

FIND THE COMPLETE ARTICLE HERE

https://www.gloucestertimes.com/news/best-year-ever-for-plovers-at-good-harbor-beach/article_cba646a6-32d4-11ed-ba55-1fc4ad06ff8b.html

IT STOPS HERE BY MJ BOYLAN PRSENTED AT THE GLOUCESTER STAGE CO!

Please join Mary John Boylan at the Gloucester Stage Company for a free play reading of It Stops Here on Tuesday evening, September 20th, at 7:30 pm.

Reserve your seat now as they are going fast!

LA LUNA, THE CALICO BLUE HERON

If you have seen a congregation of white herons at Niles Pond, chances are they were not Snowy Egrets or Great White Egrets, but Little Blue Herons.

During the summer of 2022, we had an extraordinary wildlife event unfolding at Niles Pond. In an average year we only see a handful, if any, Little Blue Herons at Niles. Amazingly, on any given evening in August of this year, I counted at a minimum two dozen; one especially astonishing evening’s count totaled more than 65!

Little Blue Herons are an average-sized wading bird, smaller than Great Blue Herons and Great Egrets but larger than Little Green Herons and Black-crowned Night Herons.

Little Blues in their first hatch summer are often confused with Snowy Egrets because they are similar in size and color. A Little Blue Heron, despite its name, is mostly pure white its first hatch summer (the wings are tipped in slate gray).  Their bills are pale greyish blue at the base and black at the tip, with yellowy-green legs.By its third summer, Little Blue adults have attained the two-toned rich moody blue body plumage and violet head and neck feathers.

It’s the Little Blue’s second hatch year, in-between juvenile and adult, when it shows a lovely bi-color, calico pattern that is the most enchanting. The feather patterning is wonderfully varied as the bird is losing its white feathers and gaining its blue and violet feathers. The patterning is so interesting, on one of our many visits to check on the herons, Charlotte dubbed the Niles Pond calico, La Luna.

Little Blue Herons – first hatch summer

Little Blue Heron – second summer (Luna)

Little Blue Heron – adult

Little Blue Heron adult and first hatch summer juvenile

The Little Blue Herons have begun to disperse and I have not seen Luna in over a week. They will begin migrating soon. I am so inspired by the presence of Luna and her relations at Niles Pond I am creating a short film about New England pond ecology, starring Luna!

Food for thought – Because of the drought, the water level at Niles has been lower than usual. The lower water level however apparently did not effect the American Bull frog population and that is what the Little Blues have been feasting on all summer. By feasting, I literally mean feasting. In our region, Little Blue Herons are “frog specialists.” During the first light of day, I witnessed a Little Blue Heron catch four American Bullfrogs, either an adult, froglet, or tadpole. They hunt all day long, from sunrise until sunset.  If at a bare minimum, a typical LBH ate 20 frogs a day times 60 herons that is a minimum 1200 frogs eaten daily over the course of the summer.

American Bullfrog

Here in New England, we are at the northern edge of the Little Blue Heron’s breeding range. Perhaps with global climate change the range will expand more northward, although Little Blue Herons are a species in decline due to loss of wetland habitat.

Luna in early summerSnowy Egret (yellow feet) in the foreground and Great Egret (yellow bill) in the background

Compare white Little Blue Heron first hatch summer to the Snowy Egret, with bright yellow feet and black legs and bill to the Great White Egret with the reverse markings, a bright yellow bill with black feet and legs.

HARVEST MOON OVER NILES POND

I could listen to Neil Young’s “Harvest Moon” everyday of my life

 

GUIDELINES ON HOW TO RESPONSIBLY RAISE MONARCHS

The first guideline in becoming an excellent citizen scientist is to do no harm while trying to do good. Considering the spiraling downward numbers of the Monarch Butterfly population, this basic tenet has never rang more true.

A number of friends have written in the past month with questions about captive rearing butterflies and the new listing of the Monarch as an endangered species by the IUCN (International  Union for the Conservation of Nature) and by the state of California. The ruling by the IUCN, which is an organization based in Gland, Switzerland, has no legal bearing on rearing Monarchs however, that is not the case with the California ruling.

In June, a California court ruling opened the door for the protection of insects as endangered species, which now includes the Monarch Butterfly. It is unlawful to take possession of live monarchs, breed and rear them in captivity, and conduct other interventions including covering eggs, larvae, and adult butterflies with nets, and transporting Monarchs to different locations. Canada and Mexico also restrict Monarch handling.

The ruling is understandable. There are folks who are rearing Monarchs by the hundreds, thousands, and even tens of thousands in wholly unsatisfactory conditions, ignoring safe and sanitary protocols.

As goes California, so goes the rest of the nation. I am deeply saddened that it won’t be long before we in the rest of the country will also no longer be able to rear Monarchs, even on the most modest scale.

READ MORE HERE

Monarch Chrysalis ready to eclose – native garden  phlox (Phlox paniculata)

One of the strongest reasons for not rearing hundreds (or more) Monarchs in close quarters is the spread of the highly contagious parasite OE (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha).

“Ophryocystis elektroscirrha (OE) is a debilitating protozoan parasite that infects Monarchs. Infected adult Monarchs harbor thousands or millions of microscopic OE spores on the outside of their bodies. When dormant spores are scattered onto eggs or milkweed leaves by infected adults, Monarch caterpillars consume the spores, and these parasites then replicate inside the larvae and pupae. Monarchs with severe OE infections can fail to emerge successfully from their pupal stage, either because they become stuck or they are too weak to fully expand their wings. Monarchs with mild OE infections can appear normal but live shorter lives and cannot fly was well as healthy Monarchs.” From Monarch Joint Venture

Simply put, the very best way to help Monarchs is to create pollinator habitats on whatever scale you can manage. Plant milkweeds native to your region, which provides food for the caterpillars.*  Plant native wildflowers such as New England Asters, Seaside Goldenrod, and Joe-pye, which provide sustenance to migrating Monarchs and a host of other pollinators. Plant annuals native to Mexico with simple, uncomplicated structures, such as single (not double) Zinnias,Cosmos, and Mexican Sunflowers (Tithonia), which will bring the pollinators into the garden and provide sustenance throughout much of the growing season, while the pollinators are on the wing.

Plants such as daylilies, roses, and dahlias are eye candy for humans. Keep your candy to a minimum and know that they are just that, eye candy. They do not help pollinators in any way, shape, or form.

A Monarch in the wild flits from plant to plant and from leaf to leaf when looking for a suitable milkweed plant on which to deposit her eggs. She is carefully inspecting each leaf, first scratching the surface with her feet, the butterfly’s way of sensing taste. The female will typically deposit no more than one egg or possibly two eggs per leaf or bud. When you see an image of a large cluster of Monarch eggs, you can be sure the female was raised in close quarters in captivity and is desperate to deposit her eggs.

Recommendations from the Xerces Society:

How can I rear monarchs responsibly?

  1. Rear no more than ten Monarchs per year (whether by a single individual or family). This is the same number recommended in the original petition to list the monarch under the Federal Endangered Species Act.
  2. Collect immature Monarchs locally from the wild, heeding collection policies on public lands; never buy or ship monarchs.
  3. Raise Monarchs individually and keep rearing containers clean between individuals by using a 20% bleach solution to avoid spreading diseases or mold.
  4. Provide sufficient milkweed including adding fresh milkweed daily.
  5. Keep rearing containers out of direct sunlight and provide a moist (not wet) paper towel or sponge to provide sufficient, not excessive, moisture.
  6. Release Monarchs where they were collected and at appropriate times of year for your area.
  7. Check out Monarch Joint Venture’s newly updated handout, Rearing Monarchs: Why or Why Not?
  8. Participate in community science, including testing the Monarchs you raise for OE and tracking parasitism rates.

Monarch Butterfly newly emerged and expanding wings

Monarch newly emerged and sun drying wings

*Best milkweeds native to Cape Ann, in order of productivity: Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca), Marsh Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata), and Butterflyweed (Asclepias tuberosa)

 

 

BIRDS AND POETRY

Please join John Nelson at 7-9 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 24 for a walk around Gloucester’s Eastern Point–the opening event of the Dry Salvages Festival 2022: A Celebration of T. S. Eliot.

We will look for birds around Eliot’s childhood patch, with commentary about Eliot’s bird poems. The event is free and open to the public. Free parking at the Beauport lot at 75 Eastern Point Blvd. Registration by email is required: tseliotfestival@gmail.com.

For more information about the Dry Salvages Festival visit the T.S. Eliot website here

 

The view over Gloucester Harbor from the Eliot summer-house, built at Eastern Point in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

Photo of Niles Pond on Eastern Point by Kim Smith.

GLOUCESTER SCHOONER FEST COMPLETE RACE RESULTS 2022

Congratulations to the winners and to to all the participants!

CAPE ANN BUILT! VIDEO CLIP SCHOONERS ROSEWAY AND AMERICAN EAGLE ROUNDING EASTERN POINT DOGBAR BREAKWATER

The Schooner Roseway is a 96 year old tall ship, built in Essex, MA in 1925. When our founders first procured Roseway, they thought she would be the classroom. The reality is, and what we have learned in the last 16 years of student programming, this national historic landmark is far more than just an interactive floating classroom – Roseway herself is a teacher.

READ MORE ABOUT THE ROSEWAY HERE

 

A Schooner is Born
Launching: June 2, 1930
Gloucester, Mass.

“Standing at her bow, arms laden with flowers, and grasping a bottle of something we used to see much of before Prohibition, Miss Rosalie Murphy, daughter of Captain Patrick Murphy, who will command the craft, smashed the bottle on the shoe of the schooner as she started…” – Gloucester Daily Times

READ MORE ABOUT THE AMERICAN EAGLE HERE

 

DAZZLING GLOUCESTER SCHOONER FEST PARADE OF SAIL

A picture perfect day for Gloucester’s 38th annual Schooner Festival Parade of Sail. The Harbor was dazzling with boats of every kind, including schooners, fishing boats, sailboats, pleasure boats, tour boats, kayaks, and more.

Spectators lined the shoreline from Stacey Boulevard to Eastern Point.

With thanks and deepest appreciation to Daisy Nell Collinson and the Gloucester Schooner Festival Committee – Daisy and Stan Collinson’s Schooner Redbird in the foreground

 

WHAT WAS THAT STUNNING RED AND WHITE STRIPED AIRCRAFT THAT FLEW OVERHEAD DURING THE SCHOONER FEST? A BOEING- STEARMAN MODEL 75

If you were curious as was I about that beautiful red and white striped plane that flew overhead at the Schooner Festival, it was a Stearman (Boeing) Model 75 biplane. While filming from the Paint Factory it flew overhead, creating a circle of perfectly puffed white clouds.

Known as Stearman, Boeing Stearman, or Kaydet, about 10,000 were built during the 1930s and 1940s, primarily as training planes for the US Army, USAir Force, USNavy, and the Royal Canadian Air Force. Of the 10,000, approximately 1,000 are still flying!

From wiki –

The Stearman (Boeing) Model 75 is a biplane formerly used as a military trainer aircraft, of which at least 10,626 were built in the United States during the 1930s and 1940s.[2] Stearman Aircraft became a subsidiary of Boeing in 1934. Widely known as the Stearman, Boeing Stearman, or Kaydet, it served as a primary trainer for the United States Army Air Forces, the United States Navy (as the NS and N2S), and with the Royal Canadian Air Force as the Kaydet throughout World War II. After the conflict was over, thousands of surplus aircraft were sold on the civilian market. In the immediate postwar years, they became popular as crop dusters and sports planes, and for aerobatic and wing walking use in air shows.

Design and development
The Kaydet was a conventional biplane of rugged construction, with a large, fixed tailwheel undercarriage, and accommodation for the student and instructor in open cockpits in tandem. The radial engine was usually not cowled, although some Stearman operators choose to cowl the engine, most notably the Red Baron Stearman Squadron.

Post-war usage
After World War II, thousands of surplus PT-17s were auctioned off to civilians and former military pilots. Many were modified for cropdusting use, with a hopper for pesticide or fertilizer fitted in place of the front cockpit. Additional equipment included pumps, spray bars, and nozzles mounted below the lower wings. A popular approved modification to increase the maximum takeoff weight and climb performance involved fitting a larger Pratt & Whitney R-985 Wasp Junior engine and a constant-speed propeller.

Lots of fun this afternoon with Charlotte at Maritime Gloucester’s Heritage Day!

The staff was great with the kids. Biologist and educator Hannah at the sea pocket aquarium nonstop answered the kid’s enthusiastic questions while Noelle was super helpful with craft projects. Many thanks to Maritime Gloucester for a fun event!

Lots more happening for the 38th Annual Schooner Festival. See the full schedule here.

Especially don’t miss the ever beautiful Parade of Sail tomorrow, Sunday, morning at 10am.

THE BRAND SPANKING NEW DONUT HUT AT RUSSELL ORCHARDS! (HAYRIDES AND PYO, TOO!)

Please note –  Russell Orchards is open Monday, Labor Day, in addition to Labor Day Saturday and Sunday. They are typically closed on Labor Day, but this weekend is the exception.

Further enhancing a fun family visit to Russell Orchard’s authentic working farm is a delightful new spot to get your fresh apple cider donuts – The Donut Hut!

I may get into deep water with the following statement, but here goes: Russell Orchards’ apple cider donuts are simply the best ever! My family has been clamoring for their doughnuts for forever. RO donuts are always exactly the same warm golden brown on the outside and tender apple-sweet on the inside. We (try to) save ours until we get home. Gently heated and dipped in powdered sugar makes a wonderful treat, morning or afternoon. Miranda Russell also suggests spreading RO donuts with Nutella or cream cheese.

Thank you to Julia for the photo!

Hayrides are back up and running at Russell Orchards after a break during Covid. And Pick Your Own apple season has begun. Currently available to pick are McIntosh, Gala, Honeycrisp, and Gingergold. We came home with a bag of Honeycrisp and they are fantastic!

Freshly baked blueberry, raspberry-peach, and apple pies are stacked high and ready to take home, along with a lovely selection of Russel Orchards own grown tomatoes, potatoes, Swiss chard, zucchini, summer squash, pumpkins, honey, and much, much more.

Lovely alfresco dining area

Russell Orchards now has an electric vehicle charging station! If you would like to charge up  your EV while picking apples, download the AmpUp app to your phone and plug in when you arrive.

RUSSELL ORCHARDS is located at

143 Argilla Road

Ipswich, MA

For more information and also a wonderful array of recipes, visit the website here.

Please note –  Russell Orchards is open Monday, Labor Day, in addition to Labor Day Saturday and Sunday. They are typically closed on Labor Day, but this weekend is the exception.

SCHOONER FEST SCHEDULE OF EVENTS AND SCHOONER CHALLENGE!

Many, many thanks to Elizabeth Carey and Tess McColgan from Discover Gloucester for the invitation to the 38th Annual Schooner Festival press day event. It was a fantastic treat to watch the Schooner Challenge from the press boat, Blue Sky, with father son team Captain Al and first mate Ollie Fichera.

Festival Schedule
FESTIVAL PROGRAM

Thursday, Sept 1

  • SCHOONER CHALLENGE – 5:30 to 7:30pm – Gloucester Harbor

Join our local Schooner Captains as they participate in a friendly competition putting their seamanship to the test over an “obstacle” course. Passengers will be given their own set of tasks to win the coveted Rum Bottle Award. Visiting schooners already arrived will join the event. The public is invited to purchase tickets aboard participating schooners. Check various schooner websites for ticketing details.

Friday, Sept 2

  • All Day – The SCHOONERS ARRIVE – Gloucester Harbor with shoreside viewing

Historic Gloucester Harbor sets the scene for the arrival of over 2 dozen schooners throughout the day and. Spend the day viewing these wonderful vessels filling our harbor. Details of schooner arrival times will be provided as possible via social media.

  • 6:00 to 10:00pm – Gloucester Block Party – Main Street, Gloucester

  • What Time Is It, Mr. Fox? | 6:00-8:30pm | Performance at Music on Meetinghouse Green

Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce and local businesses roll out the red carpet on Main Street for Gloucester Schooner Festival with a street party!  Shopping, food, entertainment, and fun are on the agenda all evening.

  • 6:00 & 7:00pm – Harbor Tour of Schooner Fleet

Join Cape Ann Harbor Tours for an evening harbor cruise of the schooner fleet. Tickets are $15 and you can click here to visit their website and register.

​Saturday, Sept 3

  • International Dory Committee Exhibition – 9:00 am – Maritime Gloucester, 23 Harbor Loop

  • Maritime Heritage Day – 10 am – 4 pm – Maritime Gloucester, 23 Harbor Loop

The heart of the Gloucester Schooner Festival’s land-based activities is Maritime Heritage Day, distributed over 3 locations in downtown Gloucester! Maritime Gloucester opens its campus for a day of maritime heritage, live demonstrations, schooner sails, family fun, and new this year our Heritage Galley food truck court! We also have schooner viewing, deck tours and community organizations at the schooner docks at 65 Rogers street and across the harbor at Ocean Alliance.  See the full Maritime Heritage Day schedule here.

  • Schooner Viewing and Deck Tours! – 10:00am to 4:00pm

               THREE Locations:

  • Maritime Gloucester, 23 Harbor Loop

  • Schooner Floats – I4C2 parking lot, 65 Rogers St

  • Ocean Alliance – 32 Horton Street, Rocky Neck

  • Once Upon A Whale Song Exhibit with Artist Perri Howard | 10:00am-2:00pm| Ocean Alliance, 32 Horton Street
  • 6:00 & 7:00pm – Harbor Tour of Schooner Fleet

Join Cape Ann Harbor Tours for an evening harbor cruise of the schooner fleet. Tickets are $15 and you can click here to visit their website and register.

  • 7:00 to 9:30pm –  Boat Parade of Lights – Annisquam River and Inner Harbor

Open to all who wish to decorate their boat and enter, this is a fantastic visual display starting in the Annisquam River and ending in the Smith’s Cove area of the harbor. Click here for details

  • 9:15 – FIREWORKS!

The night sky lights up with the annual fireworks display over Stage Fort Park.  Get on a schooner charter, watch from your boat, or enjoy from nearly anywhere in the city, this spectacle is a great way to enjoy Schooner Festival.

Sunday, Sept 4

  • Parade of Sail – 10:00am to 12:00pm – Gloucester Harbor, Stacey Boulevard and Eastern Point viewing

The entire fleet of schooners joins together for a Parade of Sail not to be missed!  Whether you get aboard a schooner or watch from the shore, this is a memorable experience for all. Prime viewing areas are Stacy Boulevard, Stage Fort Park, and Eastern Point.  On the Boulevard, our Festival Chair Daisy Nell Collinson, Michael Costello, and Maritime Gloucester Historian Justin Demetri will provide live commentary. NEW THIS YEAR Good Morning Gloucester will be live streaming the Parade of Sail! Now you can tune in to the commentary if you are at Stage Fort Park or watch from your computer if you aren’t able to make it in person! Schooners proceed from the Inner Harbor, past the Fisherman’s Memorial on Stacy Boulevard, to the race starting area off Eastern Point. Click Here for Live Stream.

  • 11:00 am to 1:30pm – Shuttle Bus to Eastern Point Light

Catch the CATA shuttle from Eastern Point Gate (Eastern Point Boulevard at Farrington Ave) to watch the start of the Mayor’s Race. Free of charge, courtesy of Cape Ann Transportation Authority

  • Mayor’s Cup Race – 1:00pm to 4:00pm – Massachusetts Bay off Gloucester

The Premier Event – The Mayor’s Races!  This year’s schooners match up in small, medium, and large categories for a reach-reach competition viewing for the Esperanto Cup, The Ned Cameron Trophy, The Betty Ramsey Award, and the George Nichols & Amanda Madeira Woman at the Wheel Award.

Monday, Sept 5 – Labor Day​

Rain Date for Heritage Day or Race. Maritime Gloucester open from 10 to 4pm

For more information, please go here