Category Archives: Gloucester Harbor

You Didn’t Actually Think I’d Want to Live in That Dump Did You?

Dad Piping Plover spends considerable time showing Mom how good he is at nest-building.

Mom nonchalantly makes her way over to the nest scrape.

She thoroughly inspects the potential nest.

Dad again rearranges the sand. Mom pipes in, “Honey, i think I’d prefer that mound of dried seaweed over there, nearer the blades of seagrass. And can you please add a few seashells to the next one, rather than bits of old kelp.”

Rejected!

Here we go again!

Five Piping Plovers have been observed at Good Harbor Beach. They are battling over territory and beginning to pair up. The male builds perhaps a dozen nests scrapes in a single day–all in hopes of impressing the female. Hopefully, within the next week, they will establish a nest; the earlier in the season Plovers begin nesting, the greater the chance of survival for the chicks.

Dave Rimmer from Essex County Greenbelt reports that although many nest scrapes have been seen, no nests with any egg on any of Gloucester’s beaches have yet been discovered. He suggests that perhaps the cooler than usual spring temperatures are slowing progress.

An active Piping Plover nest scrape, with lots of PiPl tracks 🕊

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Not one, but two, potential nesting sites have been roped off for the Piping Plovers. The second site is near the Good Harbor Beach Inn.

 

 

 

 

GOOD HARBOR GOOD MORNING! Featuring Twin Lights, Two Lovers, a Photographer, and Sunrise

Gorgeous good morning, from GHB.

Happy New Year’s Day 2017 Scenes from Our Neighborhood

duckworths-gloucester-copyright-kim-smithThe Duckworth’s wishing everyone a Happy 2017

rocky-neck-star-copyright-kim-smithharbor-cove-star-2-copyright-kim-smithHarbor Star

ten-pound-island-lighthouse-gloucester-massachusetts-copyright-kim-smithHeading out New Year’s Day evening

BEAUTIFUL WINTER’S DAY IN OUR GLOUCESTER NEIGHBORHOOD

gloucester-city-skyline-winter-copyright-kim-smithFrom an early morning stop at the bottom of my hill, with a view towards the Harbor and City Hall (as well as a feisty Common Loon), to the creatures abounding along the shore, it was a gorgeous winter morning, and all set against a widely striped and deeply-hued winter sky backdrop.

common-loon-copyright-kim-smithCommon Loon at the pier, swimming very close to where I was standing and seemingly equally as curious about me as I was about it. 

connemara-bay-fishing-boat-gloucester-our-lady-of-good-voyage-church-copyright-kim-smithGloucester FV Connemara Bay

male-female-red-breasted-mergansers-copyright-kim-smithMale (left) and Female Red-breasted Mergansers foraging at the Harbor

brace-cove-seals-copyright-kim-smithThe Lollygaggers

american-black-ducks-copyright-kim-smithFlock of American Black Ducks

female-mallard-duck-copyright-kim-smithOrchestra of earth tones for a well-camouflaged female Mallard Duck

Sky over Niles Pond this morning #gloucesterma #scenesofnewengland

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Super Moon, Howling Coyotes, Flying Swan, Songbirds Going Crazy, and Beautiful Brace Cove Daybreak

rocky-neck-smith-cove-daybreak-copyright-kim-smithLast Tuesday was a photographer’s magical dream morning. After photographing and filming December’s “Long Night’s Moon” descending over the Gloucester city skyline, I turned toward the east to see a peaceful daybreak scene over Rocky Neck. Perhaps the sun hadn’t fully risen I thought and hurried to Brace Cove. The sun had rose behind Brace Rock with just enough clouds that it was still pretty, not blasted out by too much light.

I then walked along the edge of Niles Pond, meeting up with Mr. Swan who was occupied with his morning swim, which often indicates he is readying to take flight. He did, and with movie camera in hand, he circled the Pond before landing at Brace Cove, near the breakwater.

Eerily, the coyotes were howling in the distance, actually howling, like wolves, and for quite a long while. I often hear their meet-and-greet yipping and socializing barks that they make shortly after sunset, and too the terrible sound they make when killing a creature, but I have never heard them howling in the morning. I wonder if it had something to do with the full moon? Do our readers hear coyotes howling regularly?

tufted-titmouse-copyright-kim-smithTufted Titmouse

Further along the Pond walk there was a large flock of American Robins and they, along with a lively group of Blue Jays, Tufted Titmice, Song Sparrows, White-throated Sparrows, and Cardinals were hungrily eating every berry in sight, so much so that when I returned to the same spot a few days later, there wasn’t a berry or fruit to be seen. A magical morning at a magical place we’re fortunate to call home.

full-cold-moon-frosty-moon-december-2016-gloucester-ma-city-skyline-1-copyright-kim-smithDecember Long Night’s Moon

BEAUTIFUL DECEMBER SUPER MOON OVER GLOUCESTER

Last of the 2016 super moon trifecta, the December Frost Moon (also called Full Cold Moon and Long Night’s Moon by Native Americans) was the brightest moon of the year according to the Farmer’s Almanac. Whatever called, it was stunning to watch as it went down over Gloucester’s skyline on Tuesday morning.full-cold-moon-frosty-moon-december-2016-fitz-henry-lane-house-gloucester-ma-copyright-kim-smithfull-cold-moon-frosty-moon-december-2016-fitz-henry-lane-house-gloucester-ma-4-copyright-kim-smith-copyfull-cold-moon-frosty-moon-december-2016-maritime-gloucester-ma-3-copyright-kim-smith

Gloucester’s Inner Harbor at Daybreak

sunrise-gloucester-city-skyline-copyright-kim-smithThe light oftentimes glows warm golden pink over the Harbor late in the day, at sunset. On my way to photograph Niles Pond Saturday morning, it was surprisingly beautiful to see overhanging the Harbor wispy vertical pink clouds.

I love the time change with the sun rising an hour earlier because I can get out and film before the work day begins. Lately we have been treated to extra amazingly gorgeous and sumptuous sunrises and sunsets!

sunrise-gloucester-harbor-november-5-2016-2-copyrightt-kim-smith
Same morning, the view looking towards Smith’s Cove