Category Archives: Massachusetts Mammals

A WEEK WITH THE GOOD HARBOR BEACH RED FOX FAMILY PART TWO – if you are squeamish about baby bunnies, please skip over this post

Over the week I spent filming the Red Fox family, the kits became habituated to my presence. I worried about that, worried for the sake of the kits, especially after one incident where I heard a noise behind me and a kit was standing over my head looking down at me, only a mere few feet away. Several weeks later I was walking in the same neighborhood and the sound of hooves running wildly alerted me to a deer running pell mell up the hill, with a kit in hot pursuit. Red Fox adults don’t even take down deer and I wondered if the kit was practicing its hunting skills and also wondered, thinking about my eye to eye encounter with a kit, if I hadn’t looked up when one was looking down at me, if he was planning to pounce on me!

Every morning the dog and vixen brought mouths full of fresh prey to their kits. It was startling to see when an entire nest of baby bunnies was delivered, which one would imagine would be breakfast for all three kits, but was quickly devoured by the first kit in line waiting for breakfast.

Baby bunny breakfast

As the season progressed, some early mornings we would see the foxes make several trips across the beach, always with a large rabbit, or two, clutched tightly in it jaws on the return trip.

Good Harbor Beach Dad with not one but two adult rabbits

Kits eating a Shrew for breakfast

Red Foxes also eat fruits, berries, and insects. The kit in the above photo is digging for grubs

The Red Fox adults left dead small mammals all around the family’s home base, I think to encourage the youngsters to begin hunting on their own.

Relaxed Dad

My favorite few moments of filming was on a particularly beautiful morning when Dad was acting very chill. He had delivered breakfast, licked one of the kits clean, and was relaxing on the grassy knoll. The kit playfully surprise attacked him, coming in from behind and pouncing with an open jaw. It was beautiful to watch this familial scene with the Red Fox family unfold and is a moment I won’t soon forget.

Sneak attack on Dad!

Here are a few more photos. I have another batch, the last day with the Fox Family and will try to find the time to post next week.

 

A WEEK WITH THE GOOD HARBOR BEACH RED FOX FAMILY – PART ONE

On an early morning walk in May,  I came upon the sweetest scene of three Red Fox kits romping at the edge of a home with an expansive  granite foundation. They were having a wonderful time of it, playing hide and seek by slipping in between the cracks and crevices of the great granite blocks and boulders, running up the rocky hillside, and just being adorably puppy-like. I was perched in a well-hidden location and standing very quietly, when Mom soon arrived with a small mammal in her mouth.

Hide and seek while waiting for breakfast

I spent the next week or so checking on the family each morning, sometimes lucky enough to see, and sometimes they were nowhere to be found. I was hoping to simply capture a few minutes of footage to show how Red Fox share the same beach habitat as Piping Plovers, but saw so much more!

It’s a real challenge for vixen and dog to keep a family of healthy, active pups well fed. Both bring freshly caught prey to the kits continuously during the day and night. The Good Harbor Beach male was visibly more robust; the female was thin, with a slender concaving silhouette. From what I have read, she needs about a thousand extra calories a day to both nurse and hunt.  By the time the kits are weened, she will have lost 20 to 30 percent of her body weight.

The kits menu ranged from the tiniest shrew, to baby bunnies, adult bunnies, and even a very large Crow that was eaten less, and played with more. The youngsters took turns shaking the Crow in their mouths, much like how you may have seen a puppy shake a toy vigorously in its mouth. Red Fox are omnivorous and their diet also includes fruits, berries, grasses, crickets, caterpillars, grasshoppers, beetles, squirrels, mice and other small mammals.

Based on the kits’ eye color and coat, I would estimate the three were two and a half months to three months old when these photos were taken.

For the first eight weeks of its life, a Red Fox has blue eyes. At about two months of age, its eyes turn brown.  You can also estimate the age of the pup by noting the color of its coat. When the kits are in their den for the first month or so of its life, they are blue-gray. They become sandy colored for the next six to eight weeks and then develop their beautiful red color from three months on.

The week I spent photographing the Red Fox family, their coats were transitioning primarily from sandy to red, however one still had some blue.

The family has since moved from its cozy granite den and is now most likely still together as a family, but living in a more woodsy, brambly location. Coming next, Part Two.Note the brown eyes and developing red coat

OUR LITTLE CHICK IS TEN DAYS OLD!

Good Morning PiPl Friends,

Today marks another milestone, ten days old. After today, we begin to think of chicks as two weeks old, three weeks, old, etc. Thank you to Everyone for your watchful eyes and kind interest!

Yes, Duncan, if the tracks you saw were down by the water, it was our GHB Red Fox. I think it was the Dad (the Mom is much skinnier, from nursing and scavenging food for the kits). He was bringing a rabbit breakfast to the kits.

Sally – such a joy to see when they stretch and try to “flap” their tiny wing buds ❤

The cooler weather this weekend is a tremendous break for the PiPls. Last night I stopped by and people are partying much later on the beach on weeknights than in previous years, surely because of coronavirus and a lack of jobs. I picked up six empty full-sized whiskey bottles, three were in the roped off area, and fifty plus beer cans that had been buried in the sand. That smell of stale beer at 6 in the morning is so Gross!

Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) Good Harbor Beach

Thank you Deb for the Monarch sighting report. The milkweed is in full bloom in the dunes–perfect timing for the Monarchs to begin arriving. I have a friend who is so worried she hasn’t seen any in her garden. I’ve been telling her they usually arrive around July 4th, in a normal year. She will be thrilled when I share your sighting.

Thank you PiPl Ambassadors!
Happy July 3rd.
xxKim

Ten to eleven day old chick

BLUE WHALE SPOTTED OFF THE MASSACHUSETTS COASTLINE!!

EXCITING NEWS!

From the Center for Coastal Studies

Yesterday afternoon a BLUE WHALE was sighted just 13 nautical miles east of Truro, MA by the Center for Coastal Studies Right Whale Aerial Surveillance team!

Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) are the largest animal ever known to have lived, growing up to 100 ft in length and weighing between 76 – 150 tons.

The Northwest Atlantic blue whale population is estimated to be between 400- 600 individuals and they are mostly commonly documented in the Gulf of St. Lawrence in Canada. There are sporadic sightings of them off New England, but when they are seen they are generally in very deep water hundreds of miles offshore.

The most recent sighting of blue whales (that we know of) in the area was by the New England Aquarium aerial team in February, where they documented two individuals 130 miles offshore.

Massive thanks to Alison and Brigid for these photos and field notes, and to AvWatch pilots Trevor and Jeremy and ground contact Amy for keeping our team safe and on track.

GLOUCESTER COYOTE CHRONICLES – GOOD MORNING SKITTISH ONE

Not allowing for a close-up, this hungry fellow was circling round and eyeing the neighborhood Turkeys.

 

RED SQUIRREL!

Often when out walking on Eastern Point I’ll see a Red Squirrel dart out in front of me or scramble through the brush, rarely getting a chance to take a photograph. This little guy stopped for a moment at a tree stump and gave a long stare, ducked into his winter cache to retrieve a large nut, and then scurried up into a nearby tree. Such a sweet inquisitive face!

Red squirrels have a diverse diet, but most commonly feed on conifer seeds and are considered grainivores.  One of their common names is the Pine Squirrel. They also eat the inner bark of trees, fungi, nuts, seeds, fruits, grains, insect larvae, and bird nestlings.

 

Red Squirrels are widely distributed throughout Canada and the US. 

Size-wise, Red Squirrels are in between a Chipmunk and a Gray Squirrel. Here is a handy comparison image form Mass Wildlife that shows how much larger Gray Squirrels are than Red Squirrels.