The Spider’s Trap

It’s that time of year, where you’ll be walking in the woods or along a pond’s edge, when you come across a treasure trove of spiderwebs. Nearly every tree and shrub are dressed in gossamer woven webs of silk. The best time to find the spider’s trap is just after a spell of fog.

MR. SWAN AND THE “NEW GIRL” UPDATE

First off, I have to say, we don’t know if the new swan is a male or female. We are all hoping she is a female, for obvious reasons, and too because as the swan gets older, if a male, Mr. Swan will most likely chase a “him” off the pond.

The young swan paddles back and forth on the far side of the pond, along the reeded edge.

Lyn Fonzo, Niles Pond resident, shares that the young swan is becoming increasingly tolerant of Mr. Swan, although she is still extremely shy and skittish. When Lyn feeds the swans in the morning, they are feeding adjacent to each other, which is a huge improvement from only a few days ago when she refused to come out from amongst the reeds.

Mr. Swan and His Coterie of Quakers

OUR SWEET CHARLOTTE IS SEVEN WEEKS OLD TODAY

Smiles for me ❤️

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Babysitting for this adorable today ❤️

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DAY TWO FOR THE RESCUE SWAN

Our Niles Pond rescue swan has survived her second night! She is still not venturing far from the reeds. Mr. Swan is definitely aware of her presence but is playing coy and for the most part, ignoring her. The good news, or great news I should say, is that he is not chasing and threatening her.

New Swan is continuing to feed on pond vegetation. I didn’t get a glimpse of her until around 11am when the light was very harsh, but here she is at the pond’s edge, photo bombed by a stealthy Green Heron.

A NEW COMPANION FOR MR. SWAN (HOPEFULLY!)

Cape Ann’s wildlife rehabilitation expert Jodi Swenson released a Mute Swan fledgling Saturday at Niles Pond. Jodi worked with Eastern Point resident Lyn Fonzo, where they set the young swan free from Lyn’s beach access to the pond’s edge. Lyn reports that the fledgling immediately headed to the reeds. Niles Pond is dense in vegetation, most notably at this time of year, and almost immediately, it was difficult to see her hiding, although easy to hear, as she moved through the phragmites and cattails.

Jodi, from Cape Ann Wildlife, shares that the Mute Swan baby has been in her care for several months. The cygnet came from Tufts and she/he appears to be about four months. Jodi raised the swan purposefully with minimal human contact so that the animal would remain wild. The now fledgling is very, very shy of humans, so please be respectful while the swan is becoming acclimated to her new environment. Cape Ann’s Mr. Swan is at least 27 years old and it is everyone’s greatest hope that he will “adopt” the new one, perhaps guiding her to maturity.

The above photo, although out of focus, is included here to show that the young one is foraging for food on her own. Look closely and you can see the pond vegetation dangling from her mouth. This is a great sign, that she can feed herself!!

Please visit Jodi’s website, Cape Ann Wildlife, Inc. I am sure we can all imagine how costly and time consuming it is to rehabilitate orphaned and injured wildlife. If so inclined, please think about making a tax deductible donation. Our deepest thanks and appreciation to Jodi for all the care and love she gives to Cape Ann’s most vulnerable animals. Until recently, Jodi was Cape Ann’s only wildlife rehabilitator. Jodi would like to give a shout out to Erinn Whitmore, who has been working with Jodi for many years, and who recently earned her state wildlife rehabilitator’s license. Erinn has founded GROWL: Gloucester Rehabilitation of Orphaned Wild Life, and will be specializing in caring for small mammals.

GOOD MORNING! BROUGHT TO YOU BY FAT AND FURRY CAPE ANN RIVER OTTERS

Soulful eyes of River Otters.

What a treat to come upon this North American River Otter family foraging along the pond’s edge. They are quite shy and mine was a brief encounter, but I hope to meet up with them again soon.

River Otters are returning to Massachusetts for several reasons, including better wetland conservation, pollution control, and the fact that the remarkable comeback of North American Beavers has also helped NA River Otters. For the few short moments that I saw the otters, the youngsters were playing with each other, while also intently feeding on frogs and tadpoles.

River Otter Eating a Tadpole 

Folow this link for excellent information on River Otters in Massachusetts.

WHY YOUR PHOTO OF THE ECLIPSE MAY HAVE A MINI CRESCENT-SHAPE

The simple answer is that it is a moon-shaped lens flare! The flares in your image are crescent, or ellipse, shaped because the source of light was shaped like that. Had it been an ordinary day when the sun was not obstructed by the moon, the lens flares would have been circular. A lens flare is the phenomenon where light is scattered, or flared, in a camera’s lens system, often in response to a bright light.

The crescents in my Fujifilm camera photos are pale violet; the crescents in my iPhone photos are aqua blue-green.

The Green Darners were the first to awaken after the eclipse. #dragonflies #eclipse #gloucesterma

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