SHOUT OUT TO GLOUCESTER’S ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICERS TEAGAN AND JAMIE!

Gloucester’s Animal Control Officers Teagan and Jamie were on the scene at the crack of dawn at 4:30 this morning fixing the posts around the PiPl nesting area and writing tickets. Last night Jamie was on the beach as well. Thank you Jamie, Teagan, and Chief McCarthy for the stepped up patrolling.

The posts needed to be pulled out of the sand because last night we had yet another super high tide, all the way up to the bluff for most of the length of the beach.

I read a comment yesterday that stated falsely that the animal control officers make $80,000.00 a year and sit around and drink coffee all day. I have it on good authority that their combined incomes do not total $80,000.00 a year. Stating misinformation and disparaging the hard working people in our community is creating a false narrative and is hurtful to everyone involved, to the people, the dog owners, and to the shorebirds.

Teagan and Jamie writing tickets at dawn this morning.

We don’t have as much an enforcement problem as we do an issue with entitlement and ignorance. Ignorance in the sense that scofflaws may be from out of town and may be unable to read, and entitlement in that some people know the rules and know the dangers that dogs pose to the shorebirds, yet choose to do as they please.

Upon entering Good Harbor Beach this morning, the scofflaws with their dog walked by these three signs.

Walking a dog on a beach is a purely recreational activity. For teeny tiny nesting shorebird chicks, protecting that same beach habitat is a matter of life and death.

If you see a dog at anytime or anywhere on Good Harbor Beach, please call this number: 978-281-9900.

As of late, it appears as though many more people now have the need of a service dog. Having a service dog requires that it be on leash at all times, not jumping on people, and not running through the dunes. Service dogs cannot go in the dunes, or anywhere on the beach that is restricted to humans.

Would the people with service dogs consider taking their dog to any other of Cape Ann’s stunning beaches, rather than to Good Harbor Beach during shorebird nesting season I wonder?

Folks getting ticketed and escorted off the beach.

Truly, the most important action people can take is to volunteer to help watch over the chicks. We have a number of folks posing as helpers but sadly, they are not actually volunteering for shifts. Two monitors on each shift would be ideal, but this year we have fewer volunteers, and don’t even have single person coverage during large chunks of time. Keeping watch over the baby birds will make a difference in whether or not the chicks survive. Anyone can be a volunteer and anyone of us can show you what to do. Finding people to help has been especially difficult on the weekends. Please contact kwhittaker@gloucester-ma.gov if you would like to lend a hand. Thank you so very much  

Six-day-old Piping Plover Chick

This morning’s dog tracks at Good Harbor Beach – Dog tracks are easy to spot and to differentiate from other canids (fox and coyote). For example, notice the sharp toenail indentation. Coyotes have rounded toe tip prints because they wear their nails down.

Dog tracks Good Harbor Beach

Look what other tracks were spied this week, deer! These too are easy to spot in the sand. The deer’s cloven hoof makes a broken heart shape.

White-tailed Deer Tracks Good Harbor Beach

Today’s early morning Good Harbor Beach view of Thacher Island Twin Lights 

GLOUCESTER DPW GETTING THE JOB DONE-THANK YOU ONCE AGAIN!

Phil Cucuru and Mike Tarantino installing the sign board.

Thank you again to the Gloucester DPW, and again to Phil Cucuru and Mike Tarantino. The repaired footbridge looks beautiful and the signage placement is very noticeable. We are grateful to Phil, Mike, Joe Lucido, Tommy Nolan, Kenny Ryan, Newt, Cindy, and the entire DPW and Good Harbor Beach crew for their outstanding effort in helping our PiPl family, since when they first arrived, way back on April 3rd. Their assistance, interest, and kindness is making a difference. Thank you

That’s City Councilman Scott Memhard walking the footbridge to check on the PiPl. So sorry to Scott for not getting a better photo.

We Lost Two Chicks Today

We’re so very sorry to write that two chicks were killed today. Catherine Ryan witnessed a terrible scene with a large dog tearing around in the nesting area at dawn, and a volunteer monitor observed one taken by a gull.

All that’s left of our little GHB Pipl Family – Mama (left), Papa (right) and our two remaining chicks. 

Please volunteer to be a PiPl monitor. You will truly be making a difference in whether or not our PiPl chicks survive. And you’ll meet the nicest bunch of people. Anyone of us can show you what to do. The shifts can be as long as you like, but an hour is all we are asking. The weather forecast looks gorgeous this weekend, and it is Father’s Day on Sunday, so we are hoping to have two on at each shift. Contact kwhittaker@gloucester-ma.gov.

Please share this post and help spread the word that we need volunteers. Thank you ❤

THANK YOU GLOUCESTER DPW AND HUGE SHOUT OUT TO PHIL CUCURU AND MIKE TARANTINO!

Phil Cucuru

THE NEW FOOTBRIDGE LOOKS ABSOLUTELY FANTASTIC! Phil and Mike have been doing the finish work the past few days and a deep layer of sand was added to the beach end for safety sake. I think it looks super sharp with the diagonal cuts across the pilings.

It’s been a really tough spring for the DPW after the extensive damage caused by back to back nor’easters, but getting the bridge completed before the summer crowds was made a priority. Thanks so much to Phil and Mike for working though the weekend. If you see these guys around town, please tell them how great the footbridge looks!

Mike Tarantino

GOOD MORNING! BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE FIERCELY PATIENT LITTLE GREEN HERON

You never know what gift of beauty you will encounter in the “wild woods” of Cape Ann. I never leave home without my cameras and today was a perfect example why. Traveling the scenic way between jobs, I passed a stunning little Green Heron whose rich teal and maroon colored feathers were shimmering in the mid morning sun. I had to pull over, thinking I would at best take a few snapshots because in previous encounters, Green Herons usually fly away quickly. The bird tolerated me for some time as I watched him do a slow, stealthy dance around the pond’s edge, catching small minnows as he went. Imagine how delightful to then see him catch a fish as large as his dagger-like bill!!

The Plunge!

Green Herons eat a wide variety of fish and small creatures including minnows, sunfish, catfish, pickerel, carp, perch, gobies, shad, silverside, eels, goldfish, insects, spiders, crustaceans, snails, amphibians, reptiles, and rodents.

One large fish devoured in one large gulp!

The Green Heron is found throughout the US but is a species in decline in most regions, except California, where the bird appears to be increasing. Green Herons breed in Massachusetts coastal and inland wetlands.

The Wonderful World of Wildflowers – Broomrapes

Reader Robert Millman sent photos and wrote the following question:

I am new to Gloucester, having bought a home two years ago.

As we were clearing some down trees and brush, we came upon a small stand on what I think are Monotropa, related to Indian Pipes, but do not look like any other pictures I have found.  Corliss and another local nursery were not able to provide anything further information.

Can you ask your readers or do you have any suggestions of who I could reach out to?

Thank you

Hello Robert,

Your beautiful clumps of wildflowers are the North American native One-flowered Broom-rape (Orobanche uniflora); also called Naked Broomrape. I can see why you thought it was related to Indian Pipe (Monotropa uniflora), or Ghost Plant. Neither grows green leaves and both produce single flowers, typically seen growing in bunches.
Indian Pipes photo courtesy wikicommons media
Like Indian Pipes, it is a parasitic plant, which means it does not produce chlorophyll, or green tissue, deriving nutrients by attaching its roots to neighboring plants.
One-flowered Broom-rape photos submitted by Robert Millman
There are over 200 species Orobanche. Host plants for One-flowered Broom-Rapes include species of sunflowers, goldenrods, and sedums. 
Aside from white, Naked Broomrape also flowers in lavender and yellow.
The stems of Sporchia (Orbanche crenata), a species parasitic on the fava bean, are gathered and eaten in the region of Apilia, in southern Italy. Image courtesy wikicommons media.

GOOD MORNING! BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE EBULLIENT SONG SPARROW

Song Sparrow Good Harbor Beach