Tag Archives: Northern Moon Snails

2021 WILD CREATURES REVIEW! PART TWO

Cape Ann Wildlife – a year in pictures and stories

July through December continued from part one

July 2021

Conserve Wildlife NJ senior biologist Todd Pover makes a site visit to Cape Ann beaches, summer long updates from “Plover Central,” GHB Killdeer dune family raise a second brood of chicks,  Cape Hedge chick lost after fireworks disturbance and then reunited with Fam, Great Black-backed Gulls are eating our Plover chicks, thousands of Moon Snail collars at Cape Hedge,  Monarchs abound, #savesaltisland, missing Iguana Skittles, and Earwig eating Cecropia Moth cats.

August 2021

New short film for the Sawyer Free Library The Marvelous Magnificent Migrating Monarch!, Coastal Waterbird Conservation Cooperators meeting new short Piping Plover film, Ruby-throated Hummingbirds in the garden, why we love Joe-pye and other wildflowers, butterfly friends, Monarch cats in the garden, what is the purpose of the gold dots found on Monarch chrysalides?,Black Beauty came calling, Tigers in the garden, School Street sunflowers, Hoverflies, luminescent Sea Salps return to Cape Ann beaches, Petal Dancers and lemony Yellow Sulphurs on the wing.

 

September 2021

Flower Fairies, irruptive Green Darner migration, mini glossary of late summer butterflies, what to do if you find a tagged Monarch, Painted Ladies, White-tailed Deer family, Monarchs mating, Tangerine Butterflies,  yellow fellow in the hood, and Beauty on the Wing first ever live screening at the Shalin Liu.

October 2021

Bee-sized butterfly the American Copper, Monarch conga line, Thunder and Cloud, abandoned Piping Plover egg, School Street Sunflowers, Monarchs migrating, quotidian splendor, Monarch fundraiser updates, collecting milkweed seeds, the Differential Grasshopper, Cooper’s Hawk – a conservation success story,  #ploverjoyed, and nor’easter from the EP Lighthouse.

November 2021

Bridges between life and death, ancient oak tree uprooted, autumn harvest for feathered friends, Monarch migration update, we have achieved our fundraising goal!, Harbor Seal pup hauled out,  flight of the Snow Buntings, and a very rare for these parts wandering Wood Stork calls Cape Ann home for a month.

December 2021

New short film Wandering Wood Stork, tiny tender screech owl suffering from rat poison under the care of Cape Ann Wildlife Inc., Praying Mantis in the autumn garden, masked bandits in the hood, short film The Majestic Buck and Beautiful Doe Courtship Frolic, Snowy Owl boy in the dunes, short film Cedar Waxwing vocalization, the story of the Steller’s Sea-Eagle’s foray to Massachusetts, and Harbor Seal Pig Pile.

 

 

 

SEE PART ONE, JANUARY THROUGH JUNE, HERE

 

BEAUTY ON THE WING: LIFE STORY OF THE MONARCH BUTTERFLY COMING SOON (FEBRUARY 2022) TO A PBS STATION NEAR YOU!

 

 

 

 

THOUSANDS OF MOON SNAIL BABY EGGS IN COLLARS AT CAPE HEDGE BEACH!

Saturday morning’s low tide revealed dozens of Northern Moon Snail sand collars on the flats at Cape Hedge Beach. Perhaps the storm released the collars from the ocean floor.

There are hundreds of species of moon snails, so named because they are round like the Moon. The sand collars we see locally and all along the northern Atlantic Coast are made by the beautiful Northern Moon Snail (Euspira heros).

Moon snails are marine gastropods that live in the intertidal zone. We often find their shells washed ashore but rarely see living ones. When you find a clam or mussel shell,  or even another moon snail shell, with a perfectly drilled hole, chances are it was eaten by a moon snail.

Moon snail drill holes – Liv Hauck photo

Piping Plover chick and Northern Moon Snail

The beautiful sculptural sand collars at Cape Hedge Beach are Northern Moon Snail egg cases. When you find a collar, and it is soft, and flexible, it is comprised of thousand eggs. Please don’t remove the collar from the beach. Toss it back into the water, which will also help prevent other folks from collecting.

How the female Moon Snail constructs the egg collar is nothing short of spectacular. When a female is ready to lay her eggs, at low tide,  she begins preparing her egg collar by secreting mucus. During high tide, she digs down to begin forming the collar with mucus and sand. She spreads out the front part of her foot (the propodium) so that it covers her shell.  She collects grains of sand with tiny cilia that cover her foot. Creating a sort of egg “sand”- wich, she combines a layer of mucus with thousands (and even hundreds of thousands) of released eggs and then cements all with another layer of mucus to form the flexible egg case.

The snail lies at the center of the collar as she creates it, so the hole in center of the collar gives an indication of the size of the mother snail. When finished building the collar she has to escape from her egg case sitting on the ocean floor. She digs straight down using her foot and burrows away from the collar.

The collars are pushed to the surface and, during low tide, are visible on the beach. The egg cases stay on the beach as the water from the incoming tide washes over them.

The eggs hatch before the collar falls apart. so while it is still flexible and rubbery there are thousands of tiny Northern Moon Snail larvae swimming in the mucus matrix of the collar.

Within a week or so, the mucus breaks down and the collar begins to disintegrate, freeing the larvae.

Piping Plover chick and Northern Moon Snail collar

Daughter Liv loves collecting beautiful Northern Moon Snails – Liv photos