Tag Archives: endangered species

WITH THREATENED AND ENDANGERED SPECIES OF WILDLIFE IN MIND, MY RECOMMENDATIONS FOR GLOUCESTER CITY COUNCILOR AT LARGE

Dear Piping Plover Friends,

The Gloucester citywide election is just around the corner. I want to take this opportunity to give a shout out to the candidates who I believe, based on their actions and words, are in favor of helping and protecting the threatened and endangered wildlife species that make their home on Gloucester’s shore.

As many are aware, the ordinance to disallow dogs at Good Harbor Beach was changed this past spring. Rather than May 1st, which was the previous time frame for several years, dogs are no longer permitted after March 31st. Without a doubt, the change in date allowed the Piping Plovers to successfully fledge three chicks at Good Harbor Beach, and not in the parking lot. The recommendation to change the ordinance was put forth by Gloucester’s Animal Advisory Committee and helped through the City’s government process by several key members of the City Council including Councilors Melissa Cox, Scott Memhard, Steven Le Blanc, Jamie O’Hara, Paul Lundberg, and Sean Nolan.

My recommendation for candidates does not address the individual ward councilors, only the councilors running for at-large positions.

With threatened and endangered species in mind I hope you will consider voting for incumbent councilors Melissa Cox and Jamie O’Hara. In the case of Melissa Cox, she was on board to help the Plovers immediately, from day one.  Initially, Councilor Jamie O’Hara had many questions and suggestions. He was courteous and respectful at all times, a great listener, and came to be in favor of helping the PiPls and changing the ordinance.

Candidate John McCarthy, who was the acting Chief of Police during the summer of 2018 (when the Plovers had resorted to nesting in the parking lot), went to great lengths to help the PiPls. Daily he walked Good Harbor Beach at daybreak, before his workday began, to help monitor the PiPls during the early morning shift.

From speaking with Chris Sicuranza when he was an administrator in Mayor Sefatia’s office, I know that he is entirely in favor of the Piping Plovers and will work to keep in place the current protections.

I recently spoke with Peter Cannavo. Prior to running for elected office, he had in the past expressed interest in the PiPls. He assured me that he is in favor of continuing the Piping Plover protections and I know him to be a man of his word.

There you have it, five recommendations for the four at-large positions. With each of these five candidates we can be confident that they will work to continue to protect threatened and endangered Cape Ann wildlife.

Thank you for taking the time to read these recommendations.

Sincerely,

Kim Smith

SHORT BIT OF FOOTAGE OF THE ENDANGERED RUSTY BLACKBIRD FORAGING

As I was filming a Great Blue Heron, and standing as still as a tree, the beautiful Rusty Blackbird flew on the scene, not four feet away! My heart skipped a beat and I quickly turned my camera on the little blackbird. It’s foraging habit of flipping leaves to uncover insects and plant matter was fascinating and my only wish was that he stayed longer than a brief minute.

Scientists only relatively recently became aware of the dramatic decline of the Rusty Blackbird. Reports show that the population of the RB has plummeted between 80 and 99 percent.

As is the case with so many creatures the whole earth wide, two of the greatest threats facing the Rusty Blackbird are loss of habitat and climate change. The birds are elusive, nesting in remote areas of the great northern boreal forest and wintering over in the wet woodlands of the southeastern United States. Over 80 percent of their winter habitat in the southeast has been lost to development. Changes in the ecosystem of the boreal forests has affected nesting and foraging.

Without doubt, global climate change is the greatest challenge of our day. All living life as we know it is at risk. Millions of human lives have been directly impacted by the Earth’s warming temperature. We are at risk of losing thousands of species of flora and wild creatures.

In the current political climate, restrictions on drilling and mining are being dramatically loosened in ecologically sensitive areas, not only creating a greater carbon footprint, but irreparably harming wildlife.

Politicians are gutting the Endangered Species Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918. Is your candidate, in more than only words, willing to take a strong stand to address the environmental crisis and wildlife conservation issues? Does your political party fully support renewable energy initiatives such as wind and solar? Or are they ramping up coal, gas, and oil production.

The Monarch Butterfly, Piping Plover, and the Rusty Blackbird are bellwether species that we can see in our own “backyards,” and they are sounding the clarion call loud and clear. Can you imagine Planet Earth without extraordinary and fascinating creatures such as this–and the world of beauty they provide?

Vote with your mind and your heart.Non-breeding Male Rusty Blackbird

Learning to Fly!

Three days after hatching the Rosetti’s Least Tern parents moved the chicks further down the beach and deep into the roped off sanctuary. Tiny gray and white speckled fluff balls well-hidden amongst the rocky shoreline became increasingly difficult to see.

Well-camouflaged and nearly impossible to see one-week-old Least Tern chicks.

Every now and then though I would catch a glimpse and one of the best moments was watching both chicks test their wings in short little take offs. Stretching wide their wings and in little fits and bursts, the flights lasted about two- to three-feet in length, and equally as high. After witnessing the tremendous hardships the Least Tern colony at Winthrop had undergone this nesting season, I was over joyed to see at least one family hit this milestone.

One-week-old Least Tern chick feeding.

Two-week-old Least Tern chick.

Eighteen-day-old Least Tern chick taking shelter under beach vegetation on a scorchingly hot day in July.

Eagerly waiting to be fed.

Airborne!

Winthrop Shores Reservation Beaches