Tag Archives: Haiti Projects

The Twelve Days of Christmas

The Twelve Days of Christmas Dinner Napkins

Last week Good Morning Gloucester contributor E.J. posted photos of Haiti Projects merchandise for sale. I thought you might be interested to know that the set of four napkins pictured above was designed by me.

My designs were inspired by the first four verses of the English Christmas Carol, The Twelve Days of Christmas–A partridge in a pear tree, two turtle doves, three French hens, and four calling birds. Perhaps knowing what the images symbolize, you may be even more interested in purchasing as a holiday gift!

Daisy Table Mat with Matching Napkins

Over the years I designed many items for Haiti Projects and The Twelve Days of Christmas set of napkins was one of my favorites. All of the Haiti Projects linens are exquisitely hand embroidered, not machine embroidered. Additional photos are of several more of my designs for Haiti Projects, along with links to purchase each: Dove of Peace, Daisy Table Mat with Matching NapkinsDragonfly Eye Pillow, and Sweet Dreams Eye Pillow. See also Apple Blossom Table Mat. The prices are all very reasonable and make very special gifts–as E.J. said, Give a Gift for Good.” Photos courtesy Haiti Projects website.

Dragonfly Eye Pillow ~ filled with lavender

Dove of Peace  ~ Also available in white ground with red embroidery

Sweet Dreams Eye Pillow

Cape Ann Magazine

Eye Pillows Designed by Kim Smith for Haiti ProjectsHaiti Projects Hand-embroidered Eye Pillows for Sweet Dreams and Yoga Shavasana

Look for my story about Haiti Project’s founder and Gloucester’s own Sarah Hackett, appearing in the current spring issue of “Cape Ann Magazine!” Also featured—Gail McCarthy, prolific journalist extraordinaire, has written an informative and interesting feature article about the history and restoration of Gloucester City Hall, as well as a great story about the local brewing industry. You can find “Cape Ann Magazine” at Toad Hall Bookstore, The Bookstore of Gloucester, IGA in Rockport, and other markets.

Sarah Hackett Cape Ann Magazine

Haiti Projects on Daily Grommet

Good news for Haiti Projects–a video about founder Sarah Hackett is shown on the Daily Grommet. I can’t take credit for designing the beautiful nightgowns featured. They have long been a staple in HP product’s line and are a favorite item of mine to both wear and to give as gifts. Go to the Haiti Project’s web store to see the full range of embroidery patterns. The nightgowns are made of pure cotton batiste–lovely and cool, comfortable, and flowing–beautifully embroidered, and constructed with typical HP care–French seams and hand crocheted edging. The nightgowns are easy to care for, simply wash on the delicate or gentle cycle and hang to dry.

Haiti Projects Interview with Sarah Hackett Part Five

To learn more about Haiti Projects and how to help, please visit the website at www.haitiprojects.org.

Haiti Projects is a model grassroots program designed to help the rural community of Fond des Blancs, Haiti lift themselves out of poverty, through the education initiative, the library, the artisan cooperative, and the family planning clinic.

Haiti Projects Interview with Founder Sarah Hackett Part Three

Excerpts from a recent study of Haiti Projects (conducted in December 2009)  provides evidence of the powerful impact the Women’s Cooperative has had on the lives of its workers, their families, and their villages:

“I have been able to feed my children and start building a house for my family.” – Women’s Cooperative embroiderer

“I can feed my children and send them to school, now. They have a library where they can borrow books.” – Women’s Cooperative seamstress


Haiti Projects Interview with Founder Sarah Hackett Part Two

Haiti Projects is a beacon in the village.

Haiti Projects with Founder Sarah Hackett Part One on YouTube

Part one interview with Sarah Hackett, founder of Haiti Projects, Inc., a non-profit charitable corporation. The goal of Haiti Projects is to help people help themselves through the education initiative, the library, the family health clinic, and by providing employment for women through the artisan cooperative. Raise a woman. Raise a family. Raise a village.

Sarah’s Emails from Haiti

So many have called and written in regard to our friend Sarah Hackett and the non-profit organization she founded, Haiti Projects. For friends who do not personally know Sarah, she is a woman of great vision and courage (and in her mid-80s!). Sarah is presently in Haiti, living in the rural mountainous area called Fond des Blancs, which is about 65 miles southwest from the epicenter of the earthquake. Sarah and the staff at Haiti Projects have survived, however they are very badly shaken and overwhelmed by yet another horrific tragedy that has befallen their country, family, and friends. Read Sarah’s emails, from Haiti, further below.

The goal of Sarah’s Haiti Projects is to help people help themselves. To do so, Haiti Projects developed five “arms” of self-help projects:

1) Cooperative d’Artisanat: A sewing and knitting cooperative that provides work and much needed cash for women.

2) Education Initiative: A tuition program to help poor families send their children to school.

3) Family Health Clinic: A clinic that offers planning services to those who wish to control their family’s size.

4) Library: A community library to encourage reading skills among local citizens.

5) RATRAP: (Rassemblement Travailleurs Paysan): A micro-lending program to help farmers borrow money for tools and raising animals.

My involvement with Haiti Projects began several years ago when Sarah hired me to design new linens and garments for the artisan co-operative. I was planning to travel to Haiti on January 29th through the 7th to work with the tailor and help with production of the new designs. And I was also traveling on assignment for a feature story about Sarah and Haiti Projects for Cape Ann Magazine. Of course all that is temporarily on hold. Many have asked what can they do to help. I urge you to go the Haiti Projects website at http://www.haitiprojects.org/ to learn more about this truly worthwhile organization. Donations* can be made through paypal (look for the Donate icon on the contact page of the website) or sent to:

Haiti Projects Inc.

31 Leonard Street

Gloucester, MA 01930 USA

Please give not only for the immediate crisis, but in order to support the long-term goals of Haiti Project’s mission. Any amount is helpful and greatly appreciated. Thank you on behalf of Sarah and Haiti Projects for your concern and help. I will forward any future emails from Sarah.

Sarah’s email from the first night after the earthquake: “It was quite an event. Never experienced anything like it before. I was walking down to my house and had not gone very far when the whole earth began to shake. All the motorcycles fell over, the gate shook and the ground just kept moving like jelly. We all threw ourselves on the ground and there were smaller tremors. Tison gave me a ride on his motorcycle to my house. There have been three after shocks. Everyone is shaken. The center of the damage seems to be in Port au Prince. We are fine here lots of aftershocks but the group (that was coming from Port au Prince) has just arrived safely, for which we are grateful. We hear that Port au Prince is terrible. The phones are not working but the Internet is. So while it is, I write to assure you all that I am safe and well. Love, Sarah”

Sarah, the following day: “I am fine just still jittery. The artisanat is closed. Please say that when people ask what they can do, tell them to call their congressperson and tell them to get aid here right away. All they have to do is imagine if their house fell down in Boston and they just got out with the clothes on their back, what would such people need? Everything and right away!!!! We are quite cut off here as the phones don’t work but two people on motorcycles got through today so tomorrow a car is going to try. In the afternoon tomorrow there is a funeral for our driver’s 3 year old who was crushed in the rubble when the house collapsed in Port au Prince. And as I write the 8 students that St Boniface houses in a student house in Port au Prince have just arrived just with the clothes on their backs, having escaped as the house was collapsing. We here in the backcountry have not suffered except for the continuous news of loss and for the feelings of helplessness. Mostly we have the jitters still even after 24 hours and that is because the aftershocks have been frightening—strong and continuous. They say there have been as many as 40. Still a few. Sarah”

*Haiti Projects is a 501-(C)-(3) and all donations are tax deductible.