Tag Archives: Amy Davis

FAR FLUNG NORTHERN LAPWING IN OUR MIDST – AND A PIPING PLOVER RELATION!

This beautiful Northern Lapwing has been residing in Ipswich; it is thought at least since the violent storm of December 22nd.

The Lapwing was so interesting to watch as it foraged in the pasture using the same foot tamping technique that we see Piping Plovers exhibit when hunting for mini mollusks and sea worms at the beach. The Lapwing was using its feet to instead stir up worms in the muddy field.

Also called the Green Plover, the Lapwing is very elegant looking, with glossy green plumage (when caught in the right light), and a fine crest accented with long wispy feathers.  It’s quite a bit larger than the Piping Plover, several inches larger than even a Killdeer.

The adorable chicks look like a cross between Killdeer, PiPl, and Semi-palmated Plover chicks! Chick images courtesy Wiki Commons media

Typically, the wind in the North Atlantic flows in a positive phase from west to east. We occasionally see Lapwing vagrants when the wind in the North Atlantic changes its pattern to a negative east to west flow.

To better understand why New England, Newfoundland, and Labrador are occasionally “invaded” by Northern Lapwings, read this easy to comprehend article by author Amy Davis here:

Lapwing distribution: yellow breeding range; purple wintering range; green year-long resident.

Lapwing distribution: yellow breeding range; purple wintering range; green year-long resident.

The map below shows where Northern Lapwings have been observed in the US and Canada.

Lapwings are sensitive to climate change, which is thought to explain a northward expansion of its range.

December 22nd storm damage to the berm that separates freshwater Niles Pond from the Atlantic Ocean.