The KENDALL HOTEL at the ENGINE 7 FIREHOUSE

Kendall Hotel Dalmation -2 ©Kim Smith 2015.jpgKendall Hotel -4 ©Kim Smith 2015.jpgLocated adjacent to MIT and with Google offices across the street, the Kendall Hotel is one of the few remaining historical buildings in technology-driven Kendall Square. Built in 1874, The Engine 7 Firehouse has been renovated with modern conveniences while beautifully preserving its authenticity and is replete with 19th-century inspired furnishings, American folk art, and complimentary breakfast “fit for a fireman.”

Thursday at the Kendall Hotel we installed custom-made planters with treillage to create a partially enclosed courtyard. We planted gorgeous mums in an array of fall colors; next to come is holiday decor (with lights!); and in the spring we’ll really make it sing. Stop by the whimsical and welcoming Kendall Hotel and have a look!

Kendall Hotel ©Kim Smith 2015Or better even, plan to have lunch at the Hotel’s restaurant, the Black Sheep, where you’ll find delicious home-style classic American cuisine (with choices for meat-eaters and vegetarians) and all made from fresh, locally sourced organic ingredients.

Kendall Hotel -3 ©Kim Smith 2015

Kendall Hotel -2 ©Kim Smith 2015Kendall Hotel -6 ©Kim Smith 2015The Art at the Kendall

“The artwork found throughout the hotel was carefully curated by owner Charlotte Forsythe, and includes some pieces by local artists commissioned specifically for The Kendall. Many items on display are an example of form and function, including a clock by Concord, MA artist Richard Dunbrack, which is comprised of “significant period artifacts and found objects.” A textile appliqué by Chris Roberts-Antieau, called “Circus,” is draped over the couch in the upper lobby where ceramic work by artist and owner, Charlotte, is also on display.

Pieces by American artists Richard Merkin and John Whipple hang in the upper lobby; Whipple’s technique of layering collage elements with charcoal and paint, yet letting the wood beneath show through, is reflective of the care and creativity that has helped revive the firehouse. Prints by Leonard Baskin and John Imber, both celebrated New England artists, can be found in the guest rooms. JJ Fandetti, the son of owners Charlotte and Gerald, also contributed several collage pieces, including his aptly named “Firehouse Machine.”Kendall Hotel dalmation Kim Smith 2015
Black Sheep Restaurant ©Kim Smith 2015

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