Tag Archives: Black-chinned Hummingbird

A Hummingbird’s Glittering Gorget

Allen's Hummingbird Male California ©Kim Smith 2015 Male Allen’s Hummingbird and Aloe Blossoms

While visiting Liv and Matt in southern California we saw what seemed like zillions of hummingbirds. It’s early spring there with many flowering trees coming into bloom and the hummingbirds are on the move. They are drawn to the flower’s nectar and they also eat the small insects that are attracted to the blossoms. Unlike the Northeast, where typically only one species of hummingbird breeds in our region (the Ruby-throated Hummingbird), fourteen different species of hummingbirds have been reported in southern California. The five that are most common, of which we saw three, are Allen’s, Anna’s, Black-chinned, Rufous, and Costa’s Hummingbirds. Looking at the gorget is one way to tell the different species apart however, that can be a bit misleading because unless the light is hitting the brilliant iridescent feathers at just the right angle, the feathers will look dull and dark.

The gorget (pronounced ˈgr-jət) is the patch of feathers found on the throat or chin of an adult (not juvenile) male hummingbird. The word gorget comes from the swath of metal worn by knights-in-armor to protect their throat. The Eastern Ruby-throated Hummingbird takes its name from its gorget. Hummingbirds have possibly the most iridescent feathers known in birds. The beautiful iridescence is found not only on the gorget but the wings, head, neck, and back. Reasons many are speculated as to why hummingbirds have iridescent feathers; perhaps to confuse predators, to attract a female, or to guard its territory.

Allen's Hummingbird Red Gorget Male ©Kim Smith 2015JPGMale Allen’s Hummingbird

As the male Allen’s Hummingbird turns its head from side to side, the light catches the barbed cells of the glittering gorget. The photo above and the photo below perfectly illustrate how, with the tilt of its head, you first see the iridescence in the gorget, and then not at all.

Allen's Hummingbird Male  ©Kim Smith 2015Allen's Hummingbird Female ©Kim Smith 2015Female Allen’s Hummingbird

Allen's Hummingbird Male iridescent wings ©kim Smith 2015Iridescent Wings, Cap, and Back Feathers

Fun hummingbird fact: A group of hummingbirds may be called a bouquet, glittering, a hover, shimmer, or a tune of hummingbirds.allen

The World’s Largest Ocean and the Tiniest of Birds

Black-chinned hummingbird Goleta Santa Barbar Ellwood mesa ©kim Smith 2015We were happily surprised by the sight of the diminutive Black-chinned Hummingbird perched atop a thicket, spotted while hiking down the steep descent to the beach at Goleta, Santa Barbara. I loved the view of the region’s smallest bird juxtaposed against the world’s largest body of water, the Pacific Ocean. In the background you see Santa Cruz, one of the eight Channel Islands that comprise the archipelago off the southern coast of California, along the Santa Barbara Channel.

More photos from beautiful Santa Barbara to come.Black-chinned hummingbird Goleta Santa Barbara ©Kim Smith 2015Black-chinned Hummingbird (Archilochus alexandri)

Goleta Santa Barbara Ellwood Mesa ©Kim Smith 2015